Synonyms containing regain health

We've found 5,274 synonyms:

Health

Health

helth, n. wholeness or soundness of body: general state of the body, as in 'ill health,' 'good health,' soundness and vigour of mind: a toast, as 'to drink one's health'—to drink to the health of: (B.) salvation, or divine favour.—adj. Health′ful, full of or enjoying health: indicating health: wholesome: salutary.—adv. Health′fully.—n. Health′fulness.—adv. Health′ily.—n. Health′iness.—adj. Health′less, sickly, ailing.—ns. Health′lessness; Health′-resort′, a place to which people go for the good of their health.—adjs. Health′some (Shak.), healthy, wholesome; Health′y, in a state of good health: conducive to health: sound in body or mind: vigorous. [A.S. hælthhál, whole.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Health psychology

Health psychology

Health psychology is the study of psychological and behavioral processes in health, illness, and healthcare. It is concerned with understanding how psychological, behavioral, and cultural factors contribute to physical health and illness. Psychological factors can affect health directly. For example, chronically occurring environmental stressors affecting the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, cumulatively, can harm health. Behavioral factors can also affect a person's health. For example, certain behaviors can, over time, harm (smoking or consuming excessive amounts of alcohol) or enhance health (engaging in exercise). Health psychologists take a biopsychosocial approach. In other words, health psychologists understand health to be the product not only of biological processes (e.g., a virus, tumor, etc.) but also of psychological (e.g., thoughts and beliefs), behavioral (e.g., habits), and social processes (e.g., socioeconomic status and ethnicity).By understanding psychological factors that influence health, and constructively applying that knowledge, health psychologists can improve health by working directly with individual patients or indirectly in large-scale public health programs. In addition, health psychologists can help train other healthcare professionals (e.g., physicians and nurses) to take advantage of the knowledge the discipline has generated, when treating patients. Health psychologists work in a variety of settings: alongside other medical professionals in hospitals and clinics, in public health departments working on large-scale behavior change and health promotion programs, and in universities and medical schools where they teach and conduct research. Although its early beginnings can be traced to the field of clinical psychology, four different divisions within health psychology and one related field, occupational health psychology (OHP), have developed over time. The four divisions include clinical health psychology, public health psychology, community health psychology, and critical health psychology. Professional organizations for the field of health psychology include Division 38 of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Division of Health Psychology of the British Psychological Society (BPS), the European Health Psychology Society, and the College of Health Psychologists of the Australian Psychological Society (APS). Advanced credentialing in the US as a clinical health psychologist is provided through the American Board of Professional Psychology.

— Wikipedia

Community health worker

Community health worker

Community health worker (CHW) are members of a community who are chosen by community members or organizations to provide basic health and medical care to their community capable of providing preventive, promotional and rehabilitation care to these communities. Other names for this type of health care provider include village health worker, community health aide, community health promoter, and lay health advisor.Community health workers contribute to community development and can help communities improve access to basic health services. They are most effective when they are properly trained to provide information and services to the community. Community health workers are the most promising form of delivering health services to resource-constrained areas. They are seen as secondary health services in most low-income countries are available as a service to the community.In many developing countries, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, there are critical shortages of highly educated health professionals. Current medical and nursing schools cannot train enough workers to keep up with increasing demand for health care services, internal and external emigration of health workers, deaths from AIDS and other diseases, low workforce productivity, and population growth. Community health workers are given a limited amount of training, supplies and support to provide essential primary health care services to the population. Programs involving CHWs in China, Brazil, Iran and Bangladesh have demonstrated that utilizing such workers can help improve health outcomes for large populations in under-served regions. "Task shifting" of primary care functions from professional health workers to community health workers is considered to be a means to make more efficient use of the human resources currently available and improving the health of millions at reasonable cost.

— Wikipedia

Health education

Health education

Health education is the profession of educating people about health. Areas within this profession encompass environmental health, physical health, social health, emotional health, intellectual health, and spiritual health. It can be defined as the principle by which individuals and groups of people learn to behave in a manner conducive to the promotion, maintenance, or restoration of health. However, as there are multiple definitions of health, there are also multiple definitions of health education. The Joint Committee on Health Education and Promotion Terminology of 2001 defined Health Education as "any combination of planned learning experiences based on sound theories that provide individuals, groups, and communities the opportunity to acquire information and the skills needed to make quality health decisions." The World Health Organization defined Health Education as "compris[ing] [of] consciously constructed opportunities for learning involving some form of communication designed to improve health literacy, including improving knowledge, and developing life skills which are conducive to individual and community health."

— Freebase

Public health

Public health

Public health is "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals." It is concerned with threats to health based on population health analysis. The population in question can be as small as a handful of people or as large as all the inhabitants of several continents. The dimensions of health can encompass "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity", as defined by the United Nations' World Health Organization. Public health incorporates the interdisciplinary approaches of epidemiology, biostatistics and health services. Environmental health, community health, behavioral health, health economics, public policy, insurance medicine and occupational health are other important subfields. The focus of public health intervention is to improve health and quality of life through the prevention and treatment of disease and other physical and mental health conditions, through surveillance of cases and health indicators, and through the promotion of healthy behaviors. Promotion of hand washing and breastfeeding, delivery of vaccinations, and distribution of condoms to control the spread of sexually transmitted diseases are examples of common public health measures.

— Freebase

Environmental health

Environmental health

Environmental health is that branch of public health that is concerned with all aspects of the natural and built environment that may affect human health. Other phrases that concern or refer to the discipline of environmental health include environmental public health, and environmental protection. The field of environmental health is closely related to environmental science and public health as environmental health is concerned with environmental factors affecting human health. "Environmental health addresses all the physical, chemical, and biological factors external to a person, and all the related factors impacting behaviours. It encompasses the assessment and control of those environmental factors that can potentially affect health. It is targeted towards preventing disease and creating health-supportive environments. This definition excludes behaviour not related to environment, as well as behaviour related to the social and cultural environment, as well as genetics.": Environmental health is defined by the World Health Organization as: Environmental health services are defined by the World Health Organization as: Environmental medicine may be seen as the medical branch of the broader field of environmental health. Terminology is not fully established, and in many European countries they are used interchangeably.

— Freebase

Universal health care

Universal health care

Universal health care (also called universal health coverage, universal coverage, universal care, or socialized health care) is a health care system that provides health care and financial protection to all citizens of a particular country. It is organized around providing a specified package of benefits to all members of a society with the end goal of providing financial risk protection, improved access to health services, and improved health outcomes.Universal health care does not imply coverage for all people for everything. Universal health care can be determined by three critical dimensions: who is covered, what services are covered, and how much of the cost is covered. It is described by the World Health Organization as a situation where citizens can access health services without incurring financial hardship. The Director General of WHO describes universal health coverage as the “single most powerful concept that public health has to offer” since it unifies “services and delivers them in a comprehensive and integrated way”. One of the goals with universal healthcare is to create a system of protection which provides equality of opportunity for people to enjoy the highest possible level of health.As part of Sustainable Development Goals, United Nations member states have agreed to work toward worldwide universal health coverage by 2030.

— Wikipedia

Health promotion

Health promotion

Health promotion has been defined by the World Health Organization's 2005 Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion in a Globalized World as "the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and thereby improve their health". The primary means of health promotion occur through developing healthy public policy that addresses the prerequisites of health such as income, housing, food security, employment, and quality working conditions. More recent work has used the term Health in All Policies to refer to the actions to incorporate health into all public policies. There is a tendency among public health officials and governments—and this is especially the case in neoliberal nations such as Canada and the USA—to reduce health promotion to health education and social marketing focused on changing behavioral risk factors. Recent work in the UK on relationship between health promotion and social marketing has highlighted and reinforce the potential integrative nature of the approaches. While an independent review identified that some social marketing has in past adopted a narrow or limited approach, the UK has increasingly taken a lead in the discussion and developed a much more integrative and strategic approach which adopts a whole-system and holistic approach, integrating the learning from effective health promotion approaches with relevant learning from social marketing and other disciplines. A key finding from the Delphi consultation was the need to avoid unnecessary and arbitrary 'methods wars' and instead focus on the issue of 'utility' and harnessing the potential of learning from multiple disciplines and sources. Such an approach is arguably how health promotion has developed over the years pulling in learning from different sectors and disciplines to enhance and develop.

— Freebase

Puskesmas

Puskesmas

Puskesmas (Indonesian: Pusat Kesehatan Masyarakat, English: Community Health Centre) are government-mandated community health clinics located across Indonesia. They are overseen by the Indonesian Ministry of Health and provide healthcare for population on sub-district level. The concept was designed by G.A. Siwabessy, the first Indonesian Minister of Health. Community and preventative health programs formed another component of Indonesia's health system. There is approximately 9718 Puskesmas around the country according to the Ministry of Health of Indonesia.Community health services in Indonesia were organized in a three-tier system with Puskesmas at the top. Usually staffed by a physician, these centres provided maternal and child health care, general outpatient curative and preventative health care services, pre- and postnatal care, immunization, and communicable disease control programs. Specialised clinic services were periodically available at some of the larger clinics. There are two kinds of Puskesmas, those with beds and those without one. The puskesmas without beds generally acts as a public outpatient treatment facility, is rarely open after mid-day, and is definitely not likely to be either open or prepared to deal with an obstetric emergency outside of clinic hours. This centre is usually staffed by a Bidan (nurse) and a general practitioner who provide preventative and curative services related to 18 different health programmes including Antenatal care and family planning program. These Puskesmas however have been characterised as under-burdened and problematic as these health centre tend to bypass serious patient to higher level of health services. Should a critically ill patient appear at this type of facility, the staff are more likely to simply send the patient on to the next level of care than to attempt to administer first aid or try to prepare the patient for transfer.The Puskesmas with beds are mostly located in more remote areas and ideally should be staffed and equipped to provide Basic Emergency Obstetric Care/Pelayanan Obstetri Neonatus Essensial Dasar (BEOC/PONED) twenty-four hours per day. A Bidan and a GP, who are not always properly trained for BEOC/PONED, staff these centres. Those who have been trained are reluctant to attempt procedures such as manual removal of placenta when a case requiring this procedure presents to them very rarely. UNICEF has funded BEOC/PONED/LSS training of some Puskesmas staff in three provinces early in the life of the project. They also funded education for Puskesmas Bidans on the administration of the MCH (Maternal and Child Health Specialist) program and on how to supervise Bidan in various villages.

— Wikipedia

Public Health Service Commissioned Corps

Public Health Service Commissioned Corps

The Public Health Service Commissioned Corps is the uniformed service of the Public Health Service and organized under the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHS Corps) is one of the seven United States Uniformed Services. The Surgeon General of the United States, a vice admiral, directs the PHS Corps, which provides licensed medical and health sciences professionals to the PHS, DHHS, other United States Uniformed Services and other government agencies.

— Wiktionary

Convalesce

Convalesce

kon-val-es′, v.i. to regain health.—ns. Convales′cence, Convales′cency, gradual recovery of health and strength.—adj. Convales′cent, gradually recovering health.—n. one recovering health. [L. con, and valesc-ĕreval-ēre, to be strong.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Health

Health

Health is the level of functional or metabolic efficiency of a living being. In humans, it is the general condition of a person's mind and body, usually meaning to be free from illness, injury or pain. The World Health Organization defined health in its broader sense in 1946 as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity." Although this definition has been subject to controversy, in particular as lacking operational value and because of the problem created by use of the word "complete," it remains the most enduring. Other definitions have been proposed, among which a recent definition that correlates health and personal satisfaction. Classification systems such as the WHO Family of International Classifications, including the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the International Classification of Diseases, are commonly used to define and measure the components of health. Systematic activities to prevent or cure health problems and promote good health in humans are undertaken by health care providers. Applications with regard to animal health are covered by the veterinary sciences. The term "healthy" is also widely used in the context of many types of non-living organizations and their impacts for the benefit of humans, such as in the sense of healthy communities, healthy cities or healthy environments. In addition to health care interventions and a person's surroundings, a number of other factors are known to influence the health status of individuals, including their background, lifestyle, and economic and social conditions; these are referred to as "determinants of health."

— Freebase

Primary health care

Primary health care

Primary health care, often abbreviated as "PHC", has been defined as "essential health care based on practical, scientifically sound and socially acceptable methods and technology made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community through their full participation and at a cost that the community and the country can afford to maintain at every stage of their development in the spirit of self-reliance and self-determination". In other words, PHC is an approach to health beyond the traditional health care system that focuses on health equity-producing social policy. PHC includes all areas that play a role in health, such as access to health services, environment and lifestyle. This ideal model of health care was adopted in the declaration of the International Conference on Primary Health Care held in Alma Ata, Kazakhstan in 1978, and became a core concept of the World Health Organization's goal of Health for all. The Alma-Ata Conference mobilized a "Primary Health Care movement" of professionals and institutions, governments and civil society organizations, researchers and grassroots organizations that undertook to tackle the "politically, socially and economically unacceptable" health inequalities in all countries. There were many factors that inspired PHC; a prominent example is the Barefoot doctors of China.

— Freebase

Global health

Global health

Global health is the health of populations in a global context and transcends the perspectives and concerns of individual nations. In global health, problems that transcend national borders or have a global political and economic impact, are often emphasized. It has been defined as 'the area of study, research and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide'. Thus, global health is about worldwide improvement of health, reduction of disparities, and protection against global threats that disregard national borders. The application of these principles to the domain of mental health is called Global Mental Health. The major international agency for health is the World Health Organization. Other important agencies with impact on global health activities include UNICEF, World Food Programme, and the World Bank. A major initiative for improved global health is the United Nations Millennium Declaration and the globally endorsed Millennium Development Goals.

— Freebase

International health

International health

International health, also called geographic medicine or global health, is a field of health care, usually with a public health emphasis, dealing with health across regional or national boundaries. One subset of international medicine, travel medicine, prepares travelers with immunizations, prophylactic medications, preventive techniques such as bednets and residual pesticides, in-transit care, and post-travel care for exotic illnesses. International health, however, more often refers to health personnel or organizations from one area or nation providing direct health care, or health sector development, in another area or nation. It is this sense of the term that is explained here. More recently, public health experts have become interested in global processes that impact on human health. Globalization and health, for example, illustrates the complex and changing sociological environment within which the determinants of health and disease express themselves.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. ambidextrous
  • B. ripe
  • C. fallacious
  • D. reprehensible