Synonyms containing remove for another

We've found 49,278 synonyms:

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sifo

Sifo

SIFO is a Swedish company earlier known as Sifo Research International in the area of opinion and social research. The company was founded in 1954 as Svenska institutet för opinionsundersökningar and known by the public under the abbreviation SIFO which is one of the strongest brands in Sweden. It is now a subsidiary of TNS Global which is part of the WPP Group plc. SIFO-TNS has its headquarters in Stockholm. Sifo has since 1967 published its public opinion poll "Voter monitor" which analyses the party allegiances of Swedish voters. Sifo is also known for one of the largest media surveys in the world – ORVESTO Konsument where every year almost 50 thousand people are interviewed about their media and consumption patterns. Sifo Research International merged with TNS Gallup during 2009. According to TNS-SIFO's Swedish website the merger is part of a larger reorganisation within the Kantar Group. The companies Research International, the global brand will be TNS, but local brands such as Research International and SIFO will be used in various countries. In Sweden the brand SIFO is very strong and the official name of the company in Sweden will therefore be TNS-SIFO AB. TNS-SIFO is the largest market research company in Sweden.

— Freebase

Lock-on

Lock-on

A lock-on is a technique used by peaceful protesters to make it difficult to remove them from their place of protest. It often involves handcuffs, chains, padlocks or bicycle locks. More complicated lock-ons involve protesters putting their limbs through pipes containing concrete, or a mixture of steel and concrete and is only limited by the imagination and ingenuity of those making the "lock-on". The willing protester can choose between a type that will allow them to willingly remove themselves or a type that requires machinery to remove them. In American protest movements dating from the 1960s and 70s, the term lockdown applies to a person's attaching themself to a building, object, fence or other immobile object. This was originally done with chains and handcuffs, but other devices have been introduced, including tripods and tubes or pipes with handholds built in to link a person to an object or to create chains of people. The safe removal of the protesters necessitates the involvement of skilled technicians, and is often time-consuming. The lock-on chosen by the protester may be the difference between being arrested or not, or may vary the kind or number of charges brought against them by the police. If a protester can remove themselves when asked to by the police, they may stand a better chance of not being arrested. However, if they can remove themselves and they chose not to, they may receive a charge for refusing to remove themselves from the lock-on. If the protester cannot remove themselves, it is likely that potential charges are not as important to them as what they are protesting about.

— Freebase

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Boot jack

Boot jack

A boot jack, sometimes known as a boot pull, is a small tool which aids in the removal of boots. It consists of a U-shaped mouth which grips the heel of the boot, and a flat area to which weight can be applied. To operate it, the user places the heel of the boot in the mouth of the jack, stands on the back of the device with the other foot, and pulls his foot free of the front boot. The process is then repeated to remove the other boot. The boot jack has several advantages over the removal of boots by hand. By allowing the wearer to pull his foot straight up and out of the boot, and by using his full body weight to hold the boot in place, far greater leverage and a much more secure grip are possible than can be achieved with the hands. In addition, the wearer is spared the inconvenience of having to bend over or sit down to remove the boots, or directly handle them if they are dirty. The function of the boot jack can be approximated with a variety of other objects that may be on hand, ranging from a convenient piece of furniture to a rifle butt, but these generally cannot remove the boot as easily as a proper boot jack. An adequate naturally-occurring bootjack is formed by the base of cabbage palm Sabal palmetto leaf and these leaf bases are consequently called bootjacks. Additionally, the sole of a boot still being worn can also function as an improvised jack, but the wearer using one foot to remove the opposite boot often lacks proper leverage to successfully remove a snug-fitting boot, particularly a tall boot.

— Freebase

Migrate

Migrate

mī′grāt, v.i. to pass from one place to another: to remove for residence from one country, college, &c. to another.—adjs. Mī′grant, Mī′grātory, migrating or accustomed to migrate: wandering.—ns. Migrā′tion, a change of abode: a removal from one country or climate to another: a number removing together; Migrā′tionist, Migrā′tor.—Migratory animals, animals that remove from one region to another as the seasons change. [L. migrāre, -ātum; cf. meāre, to go.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Translate

Translate

trans-lāt′, v.t. to remove to another place: to render into another language: to explain: to transfer from one office to another: to transform.—adj. Translā′table, capable of being translated or rendered into another language.—n. Translā′tion, the act of translating: removal to another place: the rendering into another language: a version: (slang) the process of working up new things from old materials: motion free from rotation: the automatic retransmission of a telegraphic message.—adjs. Translā′tional, Trans′lātory.—n. Translā′tor:—fem. Translā′tress. [Fr.,—L. trans, over, ferre, latum, to carry.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Transmigrate

Transmigrate

trans′mi-grāt, v.i. to migrate or remove across, esp. to another country: to pass into another country or state.—adj. Trans′migrant.—ns. Transmigrā′tion, the act of removing to another country: the passing into another state: the passage of the soul after death into another body; Trans′migrātor.—adj. Transmī′grātory, passing to another place, body, or state.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bunghole

Bunghole

A bunghole or bungehole is a hole bored in a liquid-tight barrel to remove contents. The hole is capped with a large cork-like object called a bung. Acceptable usage include other access points that may be capped with alternate materials providing an air- or water-tight access to other vessels. For example a bunghole on a combustion chamber can be used to remove slag or add coal. Bungholes can also be utilized to insert and remove sensing probes or equipment like mixers to agitate the contents within a vessel. Bungholes were first used on wooden barrels, and were typically bored by the purchaser of the barrel using a brace and bit. Bungholes can be bored in either head of a barrel or in one of the staves. With the bung removed, a tapered faucet can be attached to aid with dispensing. When barrels full of a commodity were shipped, the recipient would often bore new bungholes of the most suitable size and placement rather than remove the existing bung. Wooden barrels manufactured by specialty firms today usually are bored by the maker with suitable bungholes, since the hobbyists who purchase them for the making of beer, wine, and fermented foods often do not have a suitable brace and bit.

— Freebase

Counter

Counter

kown′tėr, adv. against: in opposition.—adj. contrary: opposite.—n. that which is counter of opposite: (mus.) the voice-part set in immediate contrast with the air: (fencing) a parry in which one foil follows the other in a small circle: the part of a horse's breast between the shoulders and under the neck: (naut.) the part of a ship between the water-line and the knuckle of the stern.—v.t. Counteract′, to act counter or in opposition to: to hinder or defeat.—n. Counterac′tion.—adj. Counteract′ive, tending to counteract.—n. one who or that which counteracts.—adv. Counteract′ively.—ns. Coun′ter-ag′ent, anything which counteracts; Coun′ter-approach′, a work thrown up outside a besieged place to command or check the approaches of the besieger; Coun′ter-attrac′tion, attraction in an opposite direction.—adj. Coun′ter-attract′ive, attracting in an opposite direction.—v.t. Counterbal′ance, to balance by weight on the opposite side: to act against with equal weight, power, or influence.—ns. Coun′terbalance, an equal weight, power, or agency working in opposition; Coun′terbase (see Contrabass); Coun′ter-batt′ery (mil.), a battery erected to oppose another; Coun′ter-blast, something done in opposition to another thing; Coun′ter-bond, a bond to protect from contingent loss one who has given bond for another.—v.t. Coun′ter-brace (naut.), to brace or fasten (the head-yards and after-yards) in opposite ways.—n. the lee-brace of the fore-topsail-yard.—n. Coun′terbuff, a stroke that stops motion or causes a recoil.—v.t. to drive back by such.—ns. Coun′ter-cast (Spens.), a contrary cast, counterplot, trick; Coun′ter-cast′er (Shak.), one who casts accounts: a book-keeper—used in contempt; Coun′ter-change, (Shak.), exchange, reciprocation.—p.adj. Coun′terchanged′, exchanged: (her.) intermixed or set one against the other, as the colours of the field and charge.—n. Coun′ter-charge, a charge brought forward in opposition to another charge.—v.t. Coun′tercharm, to destroy or dissolve the effects of another charm.—n. that which destroys the effects of another charm.—v.t. Coun′ter-check, to check by some obstacle: to rebuke.—ns. Counter-check′, a check in opposition to another: a rebuke; Counter-claim, kown′tėr-klām, n. a cross-demand brought forward as a partial or complete set-off against another claim.; Coun′ter-curr′ent, a current flowing in an opposite direction; Coun′ter-drain, a drain alongside a canal, &c., to carry off water oozing out.—v.t. Coun′terdraw, to trace on oile

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ruthin

Ruthin

Ruthin is the county town of Denbighshire in north Wales. Located around a hill in the southern part of the Vale of Clwyd - the older part of the town, the castle and Saint Peter's Square are located on top of the hill, while many newer parts of the town are on the floodplain of the River Clwyd. Ruthin also has villages on the outskirts of the town such as Pwllglas and Rhewl. The name 'Ruthin' comes from the Welsh words rhudd and din, and refers to the colour of the new red sandstone which forms the geologic basis of the area, and from which the castle was constructed in 1277-1284. The original name of Rhuthin was 'Castell Coch yng Ngwern-fôr'.

— Freebase

Ultima Thule

Ultima Thule

Ultima Thule is a Swedish rock band. Their style is based on what they call Vikingarock, which combines occasional folk melodies with rock, mixed with Oi!, street punk and Teddy Boy. Some of their lyrics are versions of poems and traditional songs by Evert Taube, such as "Änglamark". They have also released a version of Sweden's national anthem, "Du gamla, Du fria'". They have been described as a white power band, though ethnomusicologist Benjamin Teitelbaum disputes this classification. För Fäderneslandet is Ultima Thule's most popular album, selling more than 100,000 copies. Vikingabalk, their second best selling album, went gold with more than 80,000 copies sold.

— Freebase

Transplant

Transplant

trans-plant′, v.t. to remove and plant in another place: to remove.—adj. Transplan′table.—ns. Transplantā′tion, act of transplanting, the removal of a living plant to another place, the removal of living tissue from one part of the body, or from one individual, to another; Transplan′ter, a machine for moving trees.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Generation

Generation

a single step or stage in the succession of natural descent; a rank or remove in genealogy. Hence: The body of those who are of the same genealogical rank or remove from an ancestor; the mass of beings living at one period; also, the average lifetime of man, or the ordinary period of time at which one rank follows another, or father is succeeded by child, usually assumed to be one third of a century; an age

— Webster Dictionary

Migrate

Migrate

to remove from one country or region to another, with a view to residence; to change one's place of residence; to remove; as, the Moors who migrated from Africa into Spain; to migrate to the West

— Webster Dictionary

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A synonym for "drooping"
  • A. upright
  • B. sagging
  • C. tense
  • D. erect