Synonyms containing set ones shoulder to the wheel

We've found 94,517 synonyms:

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tea dance

Tea dance

A tea dance, or thé dansant is a summer or autumn afternoon or early-evening dance from four to seven, sometimes preceded in the English countryside by a garden party. The function evolved from the concept of the afternoon tea, and J. Pettigrew traces its origin to the French colonization of Morocco. Books on Victorian Era etiquette such as Party-giving on Every Scale, included detailed instructions for hosting such gatherings. By 1880 it was noted "Afternoon dances are seldom given in London, but are a popular form of entertainment in the suburbs, in garrison-towns, watering-places, etc." Tea dances were given by Royal Navy officers aboard ships at various naval stations, the expenses shared by the captain and officers, as they were shared by colonels and officers at barrack dances in mess rooms ashore. The usual refreshments in 1880 were tea and coffee, ices, champagne-cup and claret-cup, fruit, sandwiches, cake and biscuits. Even after the introduction of the phonograph the expected feature was a live orchestra – often referred to as a palm court orchestra – or a small band playing light classical music. The types of dances performed during tea dances included Waltzes, Tangos and, by the late 1920s, The Charleston.

— Freebase

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Wheel

Wheel

hwēl, n. a circular frame turning on an axle: an old instrument of torture: a steering-wheel: (fig.) the course of events, from the wheel, one of the attributes of Fortune, the emblem of mutability: (coll.) a bicycle or tricycle: circular motion: principle of life or motion: (Shak.) a refrain: (pl.) chariot: (slang) a dollar.—v.t. to cause to whirl: to convey on wheels: to turn.—v.i. to turn round or on an axis: to roll forward: to change direction: to move in a circle: to change about: (coll.) to ride a bicycle or tricycle.—ns. Wheel′-an′imal, -animal′cule, a rotifer; Wheel′-barrow, a barrow supported on one wheel and two handles, and driven forward by one man; Wheel′-boat, a boat having wheels, for use on water or on inclined planes; Wheel′-carr′iage, any kind of carriage moved on wheels; Wheel′-chair, a chair moving on wheels.—adj. Wheel′-cut, cut, or ground and polished, on a wheel—of glass.—n. Wheel′-cut′ter, a machine for cutting the teeth on watch and clock wheels.—p.adj. Wheeled, having wheels.—ns. Wheel′er, one who wheels: the horse nearest the wheels of a carriage: a maker of wheels; Wheel′-horse, one of the horses next the wheels in a team; Wheel′-house, a box or small house erected over the steering-wheel in ships: a paddle-box; Wheel′ing, the act of moving or conveying on wheels: a turning or circular movement of troops; Wheel′-lock, a lock for firing a gun by means of a small steel wheel; Wheel′man, a steersman: a cyclist; Wheel′-plough, a plough the depth of whose furrow is regulated by a wheel; Wheel′-race, the part of a race in which the water-wheel is fixed; Wheel′-tax, a tax on carriages; Wheel′-win′dow, a circular window with radiating tracery; Wheel′-work, a combination of wheels and their connection in machinery; Wheel′wright, a wright who makes wheels and wheel-carriages.—adj. Wheel′y, like a wheel.—Wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers, in its primitive form a cylindrical axle, on which a wheel, concentric with the axle, is firmly fastened, the power being applied to the wheel, and the weight attached to the axis; Wheel of life (see Zoetrope); Wheels within wheels, a complication of circumstances.—Break a butterfly (fly, &c.) upon the wheel, to inflict a punishment out of all proportion to the offence: to employ great exertions for insignificant ends. [A.S. hwéol; Ice. hjól.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Set

Set

set, v.t. to make to sit: to place: to fix: to put in a condition for use, to make ready, to arrange, prepare, furnish, draw up: to render motionless: to determine beforehand: to obstruct: to plant, place so as to promote growth: to place a brooding fowl on a nest containing eggs: to fix in metal: to put and fix in its proper place, as a broken limb, &c.: to assign, as a price: to sharpen: to spread, as sails: to pitch, as a tune: to adapt music to: to frame, mount, or adorn with something fixed: to stud: to point, as a dog: to accompany part or the whole of the way: (Scot.) to let to a tenant: to compose, put into type: (prov.) to become, as a dress, &c.—v.i. to sink below the horizon: to decline: to become fixed: to congeal: to begin the growth of fruit: to have a certain direction in motion: to acquire a set or bend: to point out game: to apply (one's self):—pr.p. set′ting; pa.t. and pa.p. set.—n. Set′-back, a check to progress: an overflow.—adj. Set-by′ (Scot.), proud, reserved.—ns. Set′-down, a rebuke, snubbing; Set′-off, a claim set up against another: a counterbalance: an ornament; Set′-out, preparations: a display of dishes, dress, &c.: a company, clique; Set′-to, a conflict in boxing, argument, &c.; Set′-up, bearing of a person.—adj. hilarious, tipsy.—Set about, to begin; Set abroach, to tap and leave running: to give publicity to; Set against, to oppose; Set agoing, to make begin to move; Set apart, to separate from the rest, to reserve: (B.) to promote; Set aside, to put away, to omit or reject; Set at ease, to quiet, content; Set at naught (see Naught); Set at work, to put to a task; Set before, to put in front of one; Set by, to put aside: (B.) to value or esteem; Set by the compass, to note the bearing by the compass; Set down, to lay on the ground: to put down in writing: to fix in one's mind: to attribute, charge: to lay down authoritatively: to give a severe rebuke to; Set eyes on, to see, fix one's eyes on; Set forth, to exhibit, display: to praise, recommend: to publish: (B.) to set off to advantage: to set out on a journey; Set forward (B.), to further, promote; Set free, to release, put at liberty; Set in, to put in the way: to begin; Set in order, to adjust or arrange; Set little, much, &c., by, to regard, esteem little, much, &c.; Set off, to adorn: to place against as an equivalent; Set on (B.), to attack; Set on, or upon, to instigate: to employ: to fix upon: (B.) to attack; Set one's face, to turn one's self resolutely towards; Set one's hand to, to sign; Set one's self, to bend one's energies toward anything; Set one's self against, to discountenance, oppose; Set one's teeth, to set one's teeth together, as in a strong resolution; Set on fire, to apply fire; Set on foot, to set agoing, to start; Set out, to mark off, to assign: (Bacon) to publish, to adorn: to equip, to furnish: to recommend: to prove: to start; Set over, to appoint as ruler over; Set sail (see Sail); Set the fashion, to lead or establish the fashion; Set the teeth on edge (see Edge); Set to, to affix: to apply one's self; Set up, to erect, to exalt: to begin: to enable to begin: to place in view: (print.) to put in type: to begin a new course: to make pretens

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Wheel

Wheel

In its primitive form, a wheel is a circular block of a hard and durable material at whose center has been bored a hole through which is placed an axle bearing about which the wheel rotates when torque is applied to the wheel about its axis. The wheel and axle assembly can be considered one of the six simple machines. When placed vertically under a load-bearing platform or case, the wheel turning on the horizontal axle makes it possible to transport heavy loads. This arrangement is the main topic of this article, but there are many other applications of a wheel addressed in the corresponding articles: when placed horizontally, the wheel turning on its vertical axle provides the spinning motion used to shape materials (e.g. a potter's wheel); when mounted on a column connected to a rudder or to the steering mechanism of a wheeled vehicle, it can be used to control the direction of a vessel or vehicle (e.g. a ship's wheel or steering wheel); when connected to a crank or engine, a wheel can store, release, or transmit energy (e.g. the flywheel). A wheel and axle with force applied to create torque at one radius can translate this to a different force at a different radius, also with a different linear velocity.

— Wikipedia

Wheel and axle

Wheel and axle

The wheel and axle are one of six simple machines identified by Renaissance scientists drawing from Greek texts on technology. The wheel and axle consists of a wheel attached to a smaller axle so that these two parts rotate together in which a force is transferred from one to the other. A hinge or bearing supports the axle, allowing rotation. It can amplify force; a small force applied to the periphery of the large wheel can move a larger load attached to the axle. The wheel and axle can be viewed as a version of the lever, with a drive force applied tangentially to the perimeter of the wheel and a load force applied to the axle, respectively, that are balanced around the hinge which is the fulcrum. The mechanical advantage of the wheel and axle is the ratio of the distances from the fulcrum to the applied loads, or what is the same thing the ratio of the diameter of the wheel and axle. A major application is in wheeled vehicles, in which the wheel and axle are used to reduce friction of the moving vehicle with the ground. Other examples of devices which use the wheel and axle are capstans, belt drives and gears.

— Wikipedia

Shoulder

Shoulder

The human shoulder is made up of three bones: the clavicle, the scapula, and the humerus as well as associated muscles, ligaments and tendons. The articulations between the bones of the shoulder make up the shoulder joints. The major joint of the shoulder is the glenohumeral joint, which "shoulder joint" generally refers to. In human anatomy, the shoulder joint comprises the part of the body where the humerus attaches to the scapula, the head sitting in the glenoid fossa. The shoulder is the group of structures in the region of the joint. There are two kinds of cartilage in the joint. The first type is the white cartilage on the ends of the bones which allows the bones to glide and move on each other. When this type of cartilage starts to wear out, the joint becomes painful and stiff. The labrum is a second kind of cartilage in the shoulder which is distinctly different from the articular cartilage. This cartilage is more fibrous or rigid than the cartilage on the ends of the ball and socket. Also, this cartilage is also found only around the socket where it is attached. The shoulder must be mobile enough for the wide range actions of the arms and hands, but also stable enough to allow for actions such as lifting, pushing and pulling. The compromise between mobility and stability results in a large number of shoulder problems not faced by other joints such as the hip.

— Freebase

Trundle wheel

Trundle wheel

The trundle wheel is a measuring device, a simplified form of a surveyor's wheel. It is commonly used by people who need an easy way to find the rough distance from one place to another. The trundle wheel is composed of a wheel, a handle which is attached to the axle allowing the trundle wheel to be held easily, and a clicking device which is triggered once per revolution of the wheel. Trundle wheels are not as accurate as other methods of measuring distance but are a good way to get a rough estimation of a fairly long distance over a good surface. The Trundle wheel was invented by Hugh Boylan in the late 1970s when he worked as a Quantity Surveyor for a small Irish Engineering company. There were patent issues with the device and after court proceedings the company won the rights to the patent. It works by having a wheel which has a circumference of exactly 1 metre, hence one revolution of the wheel equates to 1 metre of distance traveled on the ground if there is no slip. Every time the wheel makes a rotation, the wheel produces an audible click which is then counted and therefore the number of clicks that are counted by the user is approximately the number of metres traveled. Due to the design of the trundle wheel, it is not always moved in a straight line and this inevitably adds on extra distance to the final reading.

— Freebase

Aleko

Aleko

The Moskvitch-2141, also known under the trade name Aleko (Russian: "АЛЕКО", derivative from the name of the automaker "Автомобильный завод имени Ленинского Комсомола", Avtomobilny zavod imeni Leninskogo Komsomola, meaning "Automotive Factory of Lenin's Komsomol"), is a Russian mid-size car that was first announced in 1985 and sold in the Soviet Union and its successor states between 1986 and 1997 by the now defunct Moskvitch Company, based in Moscow, Russia. It was replaced by the modernised M-2141-02 Svyatogor and its sedan body version, the M-2142, in 1997–2003. The Aleko was a huge improvement over previous Moskvitch models, which were durable but old-fashioned saloons and station wagons (estates) with rear-wheel drive and a solid rear axle, and had no common parts with them apart from the engine and some other minor details. The new car had such innovative features as front-wheel drive, a hatchback body style, MacPherson strut front suspension and torsion-crank rear suspension. It had rack-and-pinion steering and a collapsible steering column. The spare tyre was located underneath the boot and was accessible from outside, in the tradition of French cars. The wheelbase went up almost 20 centimetres (7.9 in), the body got 14 centimetres (5.5 in) wider, the wheel size went up one inch (14 inches). The car became more spacious, comfortable and safe. For the first time in the history of Soviet and Russian car making, the car's profile was optimized for aerodynamics, with the help of Russian and, partially, French engineers, who shortly cooperated with them at the final stage of the development process. The officially reported drag coefficient was 0.35.Before the development of the M-2141 started, Moskvitch engineers had been working on a new series of rear-wheel drive cars and had developed it to the stage of pre-production prototypes. However, surprisingly for them, the Minister of Automobile Industry required them to cease all work on the unfinished project and instead create a front-wheel drive car with its upper part identical to that of the French Simca 1307, which was favoured by him. While this decision helped to cut the development costs, it came as an insult to the engineers and designers, who had their own mock-ups of the future car ready. Designer Igor Zaytsev recalled that it took more than a month to motivate his disappointed colleagues to get involved in the new project.However, besides the fact that the AZLK designers considered it "insulting and humiliating" to copy an existing car, it came out that the new powertrain and chassis required a different bodyshell, and despite the two cars having similar shapes, the only parts of the French car that were borrowed to the Moskvitch-2141 were some constructive elements of the roof and the form of the window seals. As the company's chief designer Yuri Tkachenko stated in 1992, the differences between the Simca and the M-2141 were so numerous and significant that it was more correct to say what details were borrowed from the Simca rather than what was added to its design. It is only the top of the body that these models have in common. The existing engine was too long for transverse placement, so it was placed longitudinally, like on the Renault 20/30 or Audi 80/100 series. The Aleko turned out to be quite a breakthrough for the Soviet automotive industry of its time. It almost became the first front-wheel drive hatchback of the Soviet Union, but due to the fact that its development took a further two years for Moskvitch to set up the manufacturing, the Lada Samara arrived first. Although the M-2141 had a more comfortable design than the Samara, the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 followed by an economic crisis, financial mismanagement and disruptions in the work of the company caused a decline in assembling quality in the 1990s and damaged the reputation of this car in the markets. Nonetheless, even then, it was still praised for a high level of passive safety, robustness of construction, good off-road capabilities, and ease of repair. In 2001 the aging M-2141, designed in the late 1970s and early 1980s and lacking modern airbags and seatbelts with pretensioners, was awarded zero stars out of a possible four by the new Russian ARCAP safety assessment program, but the reviewers pointed out that for a 20-year-old car it showed an "excellent" crash-test result. The steering column and the A-pillar were displaced less than in the Citroen Xantia and early Audi A4.Before 1991, AZLK designers also created the four-wheel-drive Moskvich-21416SE and a sedan version of the M-2141 equipped with a different steering wheel and an electronic instrument cluster that was publicly demonstrated in 1990, but none of these cars were put into series production due to the hardships brought by the collapse of the Soviet Union. Although AZLK had designed and fully tested a new and more powerful generation of four-cylinder gasoline and diesel engines for the M-2141,

— Wikipedia

Water wheel

Water wheel

any wheel for propelling machinery or for other purposes, that is made to rotate by the direct action of water; -- called an overshot wheel when the water is applied at the top, an undershot wheel when at the bottom, a breast wheel when at an intermediate point; other forms are called reaction wheel, vortex wheel, turbine wheel, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Shoulder plane

Shoulder plane

The shoulder plane (also bullnose plane) is a plane tool with a blade flush with the edges of the plane, allowing trimming right up to the edge of a workpiece. Like a rebate plane, the shoulder plane's blade extends, therefore cuts, to the full width of the tool. The shoulder plane is used to trim the shoulders and faces of tenons. It is used when it is necessary to trim right into the concave corner where two surfaces of the same piece of wood meet perpendicularly. It is also commonly used to clean up dadoes (housings) and tenons for joinery. Unlike the rebate plane, the shoulder plane is intended to cut end grain. There are therefore differences between it and a rebate plane in the angles at which the iron (blade) is set. There is a more acute angle between the iron and the sole of the tool. The iron is set square across the tool rather than obliquely. The iron is set face down. The ground and honed bevel forming the edge is uppermost.A shoulder plane also has a much finer set mouth, which allows finer shavings to be taken.

— Wikipedia

Shoulder mark

Shoulder mark

A shoulder mark, also called a shoulder board, shoulder loop, shoulder slide, rank slide, shoulder strep, epaulette sleeve, or an epaulette, is a flat cloth sleeve worn on the shoulder strap of a uniform. It may bear rank or other insignia. Sources disagree as to whether a shoulder board and an epaulette are the same thing.

— Freebase

Rota

Rota

rō′ta, n. a wheel: a course: a school or military roll: an ecclesiastical tribunal in the R.C. Church, consisting of twelve prelates called auditors, having its seat at the papal court.—adj. Rō′tal.—n.pl. Rotā′lia, the typical genus of Rotaliidæ, small foraminifers of rotate figure.—adjs. Rotā′lian; Rotal′iform; Rō′taline.—n. Rō′talite, a fossil rotalian.—adj. Rō′tary, turning round like a wheel: rotatory: held in rotation.—v.t. Rō′tāte, to turn anything round like a wheel: to cause to turn or to pass in rotation.—v.i. to turn round like a wheel: to go round in succession.—adj. wheel-shaped.—ns. Rotā′ting-ring, a band of brass, &c., placed round a projectile to give it rotation; Rotā′tion, a turning round like a wheel: series or appropriate succession, as of crops: recurrent order.—adjs. Rotā′tional, Rō′tātive.—adv. Rō′tātively.—n. Rotā′tor, any rotational agency: a muscle producing rotatory motion.—n.pl. Rotatō′ria, the wheel-animalcules—also Rotif′era.—adjs. Rotatō′rial, Rotatō′rian; Rō′tatory, turning round like a wheel: following in succession. [L. rota, a wheel.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Wheel

Wheel

A wheel is a circular component that is intended to rotate on an axial bearing. The wheel is one of the main components of the wheel and axle which is one of the six simple machines. Wheels, in conjunction with axles, allow heavy objects to be moved easily facilitating movement or transportation while supporting a load, or performing labor in machines. Wheels are also used for other purposes, such as a ship's wheel, steering wheel, potter's wheel and flywheel. Common examples are found in transport applications. A wheel greatly reduces friction by facilitating motion by rolling together with the use of axles. In order for wheels to rotate, a moment needs to be applied to the wheel about its axis, either by way of gravity, or by the application of another external force or torque.

— Freebase

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A synonym of "dry"
  • A. drippy
  • B. juiceless
  • C. steamy
  • D. sodden