Synonyms containing slur (music)

We've found 13,132 synonyms:

Music

Music

mū′zik, n. a connected series of sweet sounds: melody or harmony: the science which treats of harmony: the art of combining sounds so as to please the ear: a musical composition: (U.S.) heated argument, also amusement.—adj. Mū′sical, pertaining to, or producing, music: pleasing to the ear: melodious.—adv. Mū′sicallly.—ns. Mū′sicalness; Mū′sic-case, -fō′lio, -hold′er, &c., a roll, cabinet, &c. for carrying sheet music; Mū′sic-demy′, a size of writing-paper, 20¾ in. × 14⅜ in.; Mū′sic-hall, a public hall for musical entertainments, esp. when varied by dancing, variety performances, &c., often with concomitant smoking and drinking; Mū′sic-house, a place for public musical entertainments: a firm dealing in music or musical instruments; Musi′cian, one skilled in music: a performer of music—(obs.) Musi′cianer.—adv. Musi′cianly.—ns. Musi′cianship; Mū′sic-mas′ter, or -mis′tress, a man or a woman who teaches music; Mū′sic-of-the-spheres (see Harmony); Mū′sic-pā′per, paper ruled with staffs for writing music in; Mū′sic-pen, a pen marking at once a series of fine parallel lines for music; Mū′sic-rack, a rack attached to a musical instrument for holding the player's music; Mū′sic-record′er, a device for recording music as played on an organ, pianoforte, &c.; Mū′sic-school, a place where music is regularly taught, a conservatory; Mū′sic-shell, a Gasteropod of the Caribbean Sea, marked with figures like printed music; Mū′sic-stand, a music-rack: a raised platform for a musical band; Mū′sic-stool, a stool or chair, generally adjustable in height, for the performer on the pianoforte, &c.; Mū′sic-wire, wire such as the strings of musical instruments are made of.—Music (-al) box, a case containing a mechanism contrived, when the spring is wound up, to reproduce melodies; Music club, a meeting for practising music.—Musical director, the conductor of an orchestra, &c.; Musical glasses (see Harmonica, under Harmonium). [Fr. musique—L. musica—Gr. mousikē (technē, art), mousa, a muse.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Slur (music)

Slur (music)

A slur is a symbol in Western musical notation indicating that the notes it embraces are to be played without separation (that is, with legato articulation). A slur is denoted with a curved line generally placed over the notes if the stems point downward, and under them if the stems point upwards. Prime functions of the slur in keyboard music...are to delineate the extent of a phrase line and to indicate the legato performance of melodies or arpeggiated chords. Both accents and slurs relate directly to woodwind articulation...(and brass as well) [since they] employ a variety of tonguing effects [which are indicated by use of, "the correct form," of accents and slurs]. [With bowed string instruments] A curved slur over or under two or more notes indicates that these notes are to be connected...Slurs are only partially indicative of phrasing; if an actual phrase mark is necessary (to unite several bow-strokes into a larger melodic idea), it should be notated above the passage with broken lines. The example below shows two measures in 68 with a slur for each measure:

— Wikipedia

Slur

Slur

A slur is a symbol in Western musical notation indicating that the notes it embraces are to be played without separation. This implies legato articulation, and in music for bowed string instruments, it also indicates the notes should be played in one bow; and in music for wind instruments, that the notes should be played without using the tongue to rearticulate each note. In guitar music, the slur indicates that the notes should be played without plucking the individual strings, i.e. hammer-ons and pull-offs. In vocal music, slurs are usually used to mark notes which are sung to a single syllable. A slur is denoted with a curved line generally placed over the notes if the stems point downward, and under them if the stems point upwards: When two instruments written on the same staff both have slurred phrases with the same note values it is customary to have two sets of slurs, though in some scores just one set is used and it is understood to apply to both of the instruments. The slur is not to be confused with two other similar musical symbols. The tie is a curved line that links two notes of the same pitch to show that their durations are to be added together. The phrase mark is a curved line that extends over a passage which is visually indistinguishable from the slur, and indicates that the passage is to be interpreted as a single phrase.

— Freebase

Slur

Slur

slur, v.t. to soil; to contaminate: to disgrace: to pass over lightly: to conceal: (mus.) to sing or play in a gliding manner.—v.i. (print.) to slip in making the impression, causing the printing to be blurred:—pr.p. slur′ring; pa.t. and pa.p. slurred.—n. a stain: slight reproach or disparagement: (mus.) a mark showing that notes are to be sung to the same syllable.—p.adj. Slurred (mus.), marked with a slur, performed in a gliding style like notes marked with a slur. [Old Dut. slooren, sleuren, Low Ger. slüren, to drag along the ground.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Music

Music

Music is an art form and cultural activity whose medium is sound organized in time. General definitions of music include common elements such as pitch (which governs melody and harmony), rhythm (and its associated concepts tempo, meter, and articulation), dynamics (loudness and softness), and the sonic qualities of timbre and texture (which are sometimes termed the "color" of a musical sound). Different styles or types of music may emphasize, de-emphasize or omit some of these elements. Music is performed with a vast range of instruments and vocal techniques ranging from singing to rapping; there are solely instrumental pieces, solely vocal pieces (such as songs without instrumental accompaniment) and pieces that combine singing and instruments. The word derives from Greek μουσική (mousike; "art of the Muses"). See glossary of musical terminology. In its most general form, the activities describing music as an art form or cultural activity include the creation of works of music (songs, tunes, symphonies, and so on), the criticism of music, the study of the history of music, and the aesthetic examination of music. Ancient Greek and Indian philosophers defined music as tones ordered horizontally as melodies and vertically as harmonies. Common sayings such as "the harmony of the spheres" and "it is music to my ears" point to the notion that music is often ordered and pleasant to listen to. However, 20th-century composer John Cage thought that any sound can be music, saying, for example, "There is no noise, only sound."The creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of music vary according to culture and social context. Indeed, throughout history, some new forms or styles of music have been criticized as "not being music", including Beethoven's Grosse Fuge string quartet in 1825, early jazz in the beginning of the 1900s and hardcore punk in the 1980s. There are many types of music, including popular music, traditional music, art music, music written for religious ceremonies and work songs such as chanteys. Music ranges from strictly organized compositions–such as Classical music symphonies from the 1700s and 1800s, through to spontaneously played improvisational music such as jazz, and avant-garde styles of chance-based contemporary music from the 20th and 21st centuries. Music can be divided into genres (e.g., country music) and genres can be further divided into subgenres (e.g., country blues and pop country are two of the many country subgenres), although the dividing lines and relationships between music genres are often subtle, sometimes open to personal interpretation, and occasionally controversial. For example, it can be hard to draw the line between some early 1980s hard rock and heavy metal. Within the arts, music may be classified as a performing art, a fine art or as an auditory art. Music may be played or sung and heard live at a rock concert or orchestra performance, heard live as part of a dramatic work (a music theater show or opera), or it may be recorded and listened to on a radio, MP3 player, CD player, smartphone or as film score or TV show. In many cultures, music is an important part of people's way of life, as it plays a key role in religious rituals, rite of passage ceremonies (e.g., graduation and marriage), social activities (e.g., dancing) and cultural activities ranging from amateur karaoke singing to playing in an amateur funk band or singing in a community choir. People may make music as a hobby, like a teen playing cello in a youth orchestra, or work as a professional musician or singer. The music industry includes the individuals who create new songs and musical pieces (such as songwriters and composers), individuals who perform music (which include orchestra, jazz band and rock band musicians, singers and conductors), individuals who record music (music producers and sound engineers), individuals who organize concert tours, and individuals who sell recordings, sheet music, and scores to customers.

— Wikipedia

Music industry

Music industry

The music industry consists of the companies and independent artists that earn money by creating new songs and pieces and arranging live concerts and shows, audio and video recordings, compositions and sheet music, and the organizations and associations that aid and represent music creators. Among the many individuals and organizations that operate in the industry are: the songwriters and composers who create new songs and musical pieces; the singers, musicians, conductors and bandleaders who perform the music; the companies and professionals who create and sell recorded music and/or sheet music (e.g., music publishers, music producers, recording studios, engineers, record labels, retail and online music stores, performance rights organizations); and those that help organize and present live music performances (sound engineers, booking agents, promoters, music venues, road crew). The industry also includes a range of professionals who assist singers and musicians with their music careers (talent managers, artists and repertoire managers, business managers, entertainment lawyers); those who broadcast audio or video music content (satellite, Internet radio stations, broadcast radio and TV stations); music journalists and music critics; DJs; music educators and teachers; musical instrument manufacturers; as well as many others. In addition to the businesses and artists who work in the music industry to make a profit or income, there is a range of organizations that also play an important role in the music industry, including musician's unions (e.g., American Federation of Musicians), not-for-profit performance-rights organizations (e.g., American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers) and other associations (e.g., International Alliance for Women in Music, a non-profit organization that advocates for women composers and musicians). The modern Western music industry emerged between the 1930s and 1950s, when records replaced sheet music as the most important product in the music business. In the commercial world, "the recording industry"—a reference to recording performances of songs and pieces and selling the recordings–began to be used as a loose synonym for "the music industry". In the 2000s, a majority of the music market is controlled by three major corporate labels: the French-owned Universal Music Group, the Japanese-owned Sony Music Entertainment, and the US-owned Warner Music Group. Labels outside of these three major labels are referred to as independent labels (or "indies"). The largest portion of the live music market for concerts and tours is controlled by Live Nation, the largest promoter and music venue owner. Live Nation is a former subsidiary of iHeartMedia Inc, which is the largest owner of radio stations in the United States. In the first decades of the 2000s, the music industry underwent drastic changes with the advent of widespread digital distribution of music via the Internet (which includes both illegal file sharing of songs and legal music purchases in online music stores). A conspicuous indicator of these changes is total music sales: since 2000, sales of recorded music have dropped off substantially while live music has increased in importance. In 2011, the largest recorded music retailer in the world was now a digital, Internet-based platform operated by a computer company: Apple Inc.'s online iTunes Store. Since 2011, the Music Industry has seen consistent sales growth with streaming now generating more revenue per annum than digital downloads. Spotify and Apple lead the way with online digital streaming.

— Wikipedia

SDG music artist philanthropy

SDG music artist philanthropy

A form of philanthropy or philanthropical campaign, income and projects cocreated by music artists from every form and genre of music and music businesses collectively across the world for every facet of music who choose to cocreate together a music artist income fund for the SDG music artist philanthropy projects and facet of the UN SDG music artist philanthropy to ensure music artists contribute to the development and achievement of the united nations sustainable development goals. All music artists are focused positively on cocreating optimum health, human rights, right to life, shared prosperity for all, stability, unity government, solidarity, cohesion, animal rights, right to housing, right to education, right to parent, right to childcare, right to a standard of living, right to internet access, economic stability, financial stability, civil rights, equal rights, equal opportunities, employment rights, childrens rights, sustainable development, sustainable development goals, united partnership, multi-party working, community empowerment systems, equal distribution of income, wealth, fairness and justness across society, the country, europe and the world and contribute to the cocreation of global and national peace agreements, peace treaties, the universes truth and a fair, just and transparent system of checks and balances.

— Editors Contribution

Saavn

Saavn

Saavn is a leading South Asian digital media company, with rights to over 2 million music tracks. The company’s signature products include Saavn.com, Saavn Music for iPhone, and Saavn Music for Android.Saavn shifted its core focus to become a music destination for fans of Bollywood and other Indic music in 2009, re-launching it flagship product, Saavn.com, with an improved user interface and faster, smarter search capabilities. Saavn.com offers free music search and streaming supported by display ads.Users of Saavn can create their own playlists on the go, or listen to editorialized playlists. Saavn's deep catalog includes classics like Kabhi Kabhie, Sholay, Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge; new favorites like Love Aaj Kal, Om Shanti Om, and Jab We Met; and the latest releases, including Tere Naal Love Ho Gaya, Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu, Jodi Breakers, Agneepath, and The Dirty Picture.In 2010, Saavn partnered with Google to offer its music streaming services to a broader audience on Google Music India. Saavn.com was selected as a partner by Google in its efforts to direct users to legitimate content and help fight music piracy in the subcontinent, and to build up broadband usage in India via music streams.In 2010, Saavn also introduced its first mobile app - Saavn Music for Android. The free app has a 4.5-star rating and has been downloaded over 1,000,000 times. This was followed up with Saavn Music for iPhone, which carries a 5-star rating and has been downloaded over 500,000 times. In mid-2011, Saavn added its latest app, Saavn Music for Chrome, to the Chrome Web Store. Saavn has built a thriving Facebook community, with over 1.3 million likes on its Facebook Community Page. Saavn was selected in late 2011 to be Facebook's first global partner and first Indian partner on the Open Graph platform.This deep integration with Facebook allows music fans to stream any of Saavn's 2 million plus tracks using their Facebook logins and to enjoy their favorite music from Facebook, for a seamless social listening experience.In the first three days of launch, Open Graph doubled the total amount of visitors to Saavn.com - and increased the number of visitors from Facebook to Saavn by 15 times.Saavn’s products reach over 8 million consumers every month. Saavn’s management team has held senior executive positions at major media companies, including HBO, Yahoo, Dish Network, Sony and Paramount. Saavn is at the center of $12.5 billion digital transition of Indian entertainment that spans 127 different countries, and generates revenue from advertising, sponsorships, rental/download transactions, and subscriptions. Saavn has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, TIME, Fortune, Variety and Crain’s Business. The company is based in New York, NY with offices in Boulder, CO; Mountain View, CA; and Mumbai, India.

— CrunchBase

Portato

Portato

Portato in music denotes a smooth, pulsing articulation and is often notated by adding dots under slur markings. Portato, also known as articulated legato or slurred staccato or semi-staccato or mezzo-staccato, that means "moderately detached". It is a style of playing between staccato and legato, and is also referred to as non-legato. Mezzo-staccato notes are held for a longer time than with standard staccato notes, but none of the notes is attached to the next. Portato is a bowing technique for stringed instruments, in which successive notes are gently re-articulated while being joined under a single continuing bow stroke. It achieves a kind of pulsation or undulation, rather than separating the notes. It has been notated in various ways. One early 19th century writer, Pierre Baillot, gives two alternatives: a wavy line, and dots under a slur. Later in the century a third method became common: placing "legato" dashes under a slur. The notation with dots under slurs is ambiguous, because it is also used for very different bowings, including staccato and flying spiccato.

— Freebase

Slurred

Slurred

marked with a slur; performed in a smooth, gliding style, like notes marked with a slur

— Webster Dictionary

PluggedIn

PluggedIn

At first glance, music might seem to be a saturated market on the web. Sites like Last.fm have music suggestions, artists profile, and communities covered, the iTunes and Amazon music stores make purchasing a breeze, and music videos can be found littered across Youtube.It’s time to make room for one more, and it has the potential to be big. Pluggedin, a music video and community site that sees itself as a Hulu for music, launched in public beta on April 15, 2008. The site’s biggest selling point is its high quality video content, featuring music videos from labels including EMI, Sony BMG, and Universal Music Group, along with a number of independent labels. Pluggedin is hoping to add the last of the ‘big four’ labels, Warner Music, in the near future.The Hulu comparison is an apt one. The site is very clean, video quality is generally much better than what’s found on Youtube, and the amount of content is impressive, though there are some noticeable gaps. At launch the site features over 10,000 available videos, but most of them are not available in true HD quality (largely because existing footage is not hi-def). Pluggedin hopes that as the site gains popularity, content providers will have a greater incentive to film music videos in HD.Pluggedin does a good job integrating with other sites on the web. Users are provided with direct links to Amazon and iTunes if they’d like to purchase a video or song they’ve just listened to. And the site has formed a number of partnerships with merchandisers, including Hot Topic for clothing and Thumbplay for mobile ringtones. All of this is presented in unobtrusive menus that don’t detract from the experience at all. The site also features profiles for over a million musicians, including those that don’t have any videos on the site. Profiles are dynamically generated using content from a number of sources, including All Music Guide, Last.FM, and Wikipedia. And while these pages don’t feature any ‘HD-quality’ material, they do provide a list of each artist’s music videos found elsewhere on the internet, all of which play seamlessly in the page. Despite all of these features, the site still has a few issues. Searching for specific videos can be tricky - it seems that users can only search by artist name, not song title. And for a site that promotes its video quality, there are surprisingly few videos available in HD at launch (though this is mostly a fault of content providers). PluggedIn looks like it could really explode. The social networking aspect is minimal, but sufficient for sharing music between friends. It’s a great timewaster - clicking through random music has never been this fun. And the playlist feature be will great for impromptu parties. As long as PluggedIn continues to add content and doesn’t go overboard with their ads, this site will be one to watch.The site is backed by one of Will Smith’s companies.

— CrunchBase

Electronic music

Electronic music

Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. In general, a distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music), and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments include mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers, and so on, and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers, or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer, and computer can produce electronic sounds.The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century, and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). In the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry, and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began having a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines, and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the 1980s, electronic music became more dominant in popular music, with a greater reliance on synthesizers, and the adoption of programmable drum machines such as the Roland TR-808 and bass synthesizers such as the TB-303. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 were popularized, and a group of musicians and music merchants developed the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Electronically produced music became prevalent in the popular domain by the 1990s, because of the advent of affordable music technology. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Today, pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream culture as opposed to its preceding forms which were specialized to niche markets.

— Wikipedia

Folk music

Folk music

Folk music includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the 20th century folk revival. The term originated in the 19th century but is often applied to music that is older than that. Some types of folk music are also called world music. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted by mouth, as music of the lower classes, and as music with unknown composers. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles. One meaning often given is that of old songs, with no known composers; another is music that has been transmitted and evolved by a process of oral transmission or performed by custom over a long period of time. Starting in the mid-20th century a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s. This form of music is sometimes called contemporary folk music or folk revival music to distinguish it from earlier folk forms. Smaller similar revivals have occurred elsewhere in the world at other times, but the term folk music has typically not been applied to the new music created during those revivals. This type of folk music also includes fusion genres such as folk rock, folk metal, electric folk, and others. While contemporary folk music is a genre generally distinct from traditional folk music, in English it shares the same name, and it often shares the same performers and venues as traditional folk music. Even individual songs may be a blend of the two.

— Freebase

world music

world music

traditional music (sometimes called folk music or roots music) of any culture that are created and played by indigenous musicians or that are "closely informed or guided by indigenous music of the regions of their origin,"[1] including Western music (e. g. Celtic music).

— Wiktionary

Snocap

Snocap

SNOCAP was a digital rights and content management startup founded in 2002 by Shawn Fanning(creator of the original Napster file-sharing service), Jordan Mendelson, and Silicon Valley investor Ron Conway. Fanning, Mendelson and Conway founded SNOCAP in the days immediately following Napster’s demise. Many of the company’s employees, including its COO, Ali Aydar, were veterans of the original Napster team.SNOCAP’s initial focus was on developing technology content owners (in particular artists and labels) could use to register their content and set business rules controlling where and how that content is available on the web. SNOCAP eventually secured deals with all four major labels (Universal Music Group, EMI, Warner Music Group, and SonyBMG Music Entertainment) to register their content in SNOCAP’s digital registry. SNOCAP’s ultimate goal was to license this technology to file-sharing services, enabling a new wave of “legal P2P” services that used SNOCAP’s technology to track and filter music sharing within a network, blocking registered content that labels & artists didn’t want shared but allowing sharing of anything else. While two file-sharing services, Mashboxx and Grokster, signed up to use SNOCAP’s technology, their SNOCAP-powered services never launched.In late 2006, SNOCAP and MySpace announced that they were partnering to give independent artists and labels a way to sell music on MySpace through SNOCAP™s MyStore widgets. Eventually, over 110,000 artists signed up to sell their music through MyStore widgets. These early experiments were a precursor to MySpace™s efforts to sell downloads directly to consumers through its music" title="MySpace Music">MySpace Music venture. In March 2007, SNOCAP announced it was partnering with the social media site imeem to track music being played on the site and share ad revenue with artists and labels, utilizing SNOCAP™s content fingerprinting and digital registry technology. The goal was to provide a way for consumers to upload and share music with their friends, for free, and to do so in a way where label and artists can both make money and have greater control over where and how their music was available. imeem rolled out this new offering in June 2007.In April 2008, imeem acquired SNOCAP, confirming rumors first reported on TechCrunch two months earlier. That acquisition reunited several members of the original Napster team, including SNOCAP’s then COO, Ali Aydar, who is now imeem™s COO. Aydar was a key early advisor to imeem and served on its board of directors from 2003-2007.imeem continues to operate the SNOCAP digital registry, and uses the technology acquired from SNOCAP to power imeem™s ad-supported streaming music service.SNOCAP was backed by Ron Conway, Morgenthaler Ventures, WaldenVC, and Court Square Ventures. In total, the company raised over $25 million in funding from WaldenVC, Morgenthaler Ventures, and Court Square Ventures.

— CrunchBase

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. ambidextrous
  • B. reprehensible
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