Synonyms containing soa software

We've found 6,300 synonyms:

Actional

Actional

Progress Software: Actional Product Line Backgrounder As organizations make the shift to a service-oriented architecture (SOA), they do so expecting greater business agility, reduced IT overhead and improved developer productivity. Early Web services and SOA adopters have encountered roadblocks to successful implementations, whether deploying small-scale Web services projects or charting the course for wholesale adoption of SOA across the enterprise. Actional products from Progress Software provide enterprise-grade SOA management capabilities, including service and message flow monitoring, SLA governance, versioning, and security - at extremely low overhead and thus minimal impact on system performance. Every enterprise building or testing an SOA will require the capabilities available in Actional products; whether they are starting to expand early SOA projects, or have a fully deployed enterprise-grade SOA using ESBs, application servers, or other technologies. History 2006: Acquired by Progress Software Corporation2004: Actional and Westbridge Technology merge, doing business as Actional Corporation2001: Westbridge Technology founded1998: Actional founded through the acquisition of the assets of VisualEdge (a Canadian company) Awards Progress’ leadership in SOA management has gained market acceptance and validation through recognition and industry awards including: Network Computing's Well Connected Award, InfoWorld's CTO 25 (Dan Foody), Loosely Coupled SOA Management Leader, Codie Award Finalist, InfoWorld 100 and more. Customers Progress’ proven Actional technology is currently deployed by over 40+ Fortune 500 companies across a variety of industries in North America, Europe and Asia/Pacific. Key customers include: Starwood Hotels and Resorts, Hong Kong Government, MCI, Partners Healthcare, SAIC, Telstra, Thomson Prometric, Travelers, the U.S. government and many others. Partners Progress partners with leading systems integrators, resellers and technology providers including: Cisco, HP, IBM, Microsoft, Netegrity, Northrop Grumman, RSA, Systinet and others. For More Information To learn more about how Progress Actional products and services can help streamline Web services management at your organization, contact us.

— Freebase

SOA Software

SOA Software

SOA Software, a leading provider of API Management and SOA Governance solutions, powers the API economy by helping businesses to fast-track API deployment, drive developer adoption, and reach more customers. Some of the world’s largest companies use SOA Software products to harness the power of their technology and transform their businesses. The company was originally called Digital Evolution, and has acquired a number of SOA vendors.

— Freebase

Akana

Akana

Akana was a provider of computer software products for service-oriented architecture (SOA). The company was originally called Digital Evolution, and has acquired a number of SOA vendors. From March 2005 until March 10th, 2015 the company was called SOA Software. In November 2016, Akana was acquired by Rogue Wave Software.

— Wikipedia

Software Development Company in Indore

Software Development Company in Indore

ABIT CORP software development company in Indore working for 8 years in the IT industry and developing software and ERP for big industries. We have working experience in MEAN STACK, React Native, LARAVEL, Codeigniter, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP, and most other web languages. Particular emphasis and experience with building user-friendly dashboards and portals to suit all manner of professional industries. We provide the best technology developed software or make customized software ERP for industries and give business process consulting services to enterprise and mid-sized companies, with a focus on their needs and requirements of their industries. We specialize in larger and more complex deployments where customers really want to leverage CRM to transform their businesses. We also have quite a good experience in website developments and mobile developments. We offer a broad range of IT services which include software, web development, mobile app development, SEO, SMO, server or hosting, bulk SMS, domain and Playstore. One of our key objectives as a developer is to make sure that all work is done in a high-quality timely manner. We focus on timely delivery, quality work, optimized solution. We have made many software and ERP like School Management ERP ERP for packaging FIBC industry ERP for Power industry ERP for Steel manufacturing industry Accounting software CRM Software Sales Tracking software HR Payroll Software Ecommerce company inventory software Billing software Dispatch and delivery management software Pharma ERP If you want to know more about our company ABIT CORP Software development then kindly visit our website. Email: info@abitcorp.com Contact: +91-8109045666

— Editors Contribution

SOA Software

SOA Software

SOA Software, Inc. provides API management and integrated service-oriented architecture (SOA) governance automation solutions. It offers Enterprise API Management; Policy Manager, which provides SOA registry/repository and SOA policy governance solutions; Repository Manager, which provides software development asset repository, lifecycle management, and metadata federation solutions; and Portfolio Manager, a planning governance product that helps ensure the alignment of SOA programs with strategic IT investment and business objectives. The company also provides Service Manager, a SOA management and security product, which provides security, routing, mediation, monitoring, and management for SOA and Web services; and SOLA, which provides a governable mainframe SOA platform. The company is headquartered in Los Angeles, California with additional offices in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Atlanta, Pittsburgh, Rochester, and London, as well as in Hyderabad, India.

— CrunchBase

SIGSOFT

SIGSOFT

The Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Software Engineering provides a forum for computing professionals from industry, government and academia to examine principles, practices, and new research results in software engineering. SIGSOFT focuses on issues related to all aspects of software development and maintenance, with emphasis on requirements, specification and design, software architecture, validation, verification, debugging, software safety, software processes, software management, measurement, user interfaces, configuration management, software engineering environments, and CASE tools. SIGSOFT (co-)sponsors conferences and symposia including the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE), the ACM Joint European Software Engineering Conference and Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering (ESEC/FSE) and other events.SIGSOFT publishes the informal bimonthly newsletter Software Engineering Notes (SEN) newsletter with papers, reports and other material related to the cost-effective, timely development and maintenance of high-quality software. SIGSOFT's mission is to improve the ability to engineer software by stimulating interaction among practitioners, researchers, and educators; by fostering the professional development of software engineers; and by representing software engineers to professional, legal, and political entities.

— Wikipedia

Richard Stallman

Richard Stallman

Richard Matthew Stallman (; born March 16, 1953), often known by his initials, rms, and occasionally upper-case RMS, is an American free software movement activist and programmer. He campaigns for software to be distributed in a manner such that its users receive the freedoms to use, study, distribute, and modify that software. Software that ensures these freedoms is termed free software. Stallman launched the GNU Project, founded the Free Software Foundation, developed the GNU Compiler Collection and GNU Emacs, and wrote the GNU General Public License. Stallman launched the GNU Project in September 1983 to create a Unix-like computer operating system composed entirely of free software. With this, he also launched the free software movement. He has been the GNU project's lead architect and organizer, and developed a number of pieces of widely used GNU software including, among others, the GNU Compiler Collection, GNU Debugger, and GNU Emacs text editor. In October 1985 he founded the Free Software Foundation (FSF). In September 2019, he resigned as president of the FSF and left his "visiting scientist" role at MIT. Stallman remains head of the GNU Project.Stallman pioneered the concept of copyleft, which uses the principles of copyright law to preserve the right to use, modify, and distribute free software, and is the main author of free software licenses which describe those terms, most notably the GNU General Public License (GPL), the most widely used free software license.In 1989, he co-founded the League for Programming Freedom. Since the mid-1990s, Stallman has spent most of his time advocating for free software, as well as campaigning against software patents, digital rights management (which he referred to as digital restrictions management, calling the more common term misleading), and other legal and technical systems which he sees as taking away users' freedoms. This has included software license agreements, non-disclosure agreements, activation keys, dongles, copy restriction, proprietary formats, and binary executables without source code.

— Wikipedia

WebMethods

WebMethods

webMethods was an enterprise software company, acquired by Software AG, focused on application integration, business process integration and B2B partner integration. Founded in 1996, the company sold systems for organizations to use web services to connect software applications over the Internet. In 2000, the company went public on the NASDAQ in the most successful software IPO to date, based on investor interest and first day share price appreciation. In 2002, the company was named by Deloitte as the fastest-growing software company in North America over the period 1998 to 2002. In 2007 webMethods was acquired by Software AG for $546 million and was made a subsidiary of that company. In 2010 the webMethods division of Software AG recorded over $668 million in revenues. Software AG retained the webMethods name, and uses it as a brand to identify a software suite encompassing process improvement, SOA enablement, IT modernization and business and partner integration.

— Wikipedia

Synthetic instrument

Synthetic instrument

A synthetic instrument is a term in metrology (test and measurement science). A Synthetic Instrument is software that runs on a Synthetic Measurement System to perform a specific synthesis, analysis, or measurement function. A Synthetic Measurement System (SMS) is a common, general purpose, physical hardware platform that is intended to perform many kinds of synthesis, analysis, or measurement functions using Synthetic Instruments. Typically the generic SMS hardware is dual cascade of three subsystems: digital processing and control, A/D or D/A conversion (codec), and signal conditioning. One cascade is for stimulus, one for response. Sandwiched between them is the device under test (DUT) that is being measured. A synthetic instrument is the opposite of the retronym natural instrument. Although the word “synthetic” in the phrase synthetic instrument might seem to imply that synthetic instruments are synthesizers: that they only do synthesis; this is incorrect. The instrument itself is being synthesized; nothing is implied about what the instrument does. A synthetic instrument might indeed be a synthesizer, but it could just as easily be an analyzer, or some hybrid of the two. Synthetic instruments are implemented on generic hardware, i.e., generic meaning that the underlying hardware is not explicitly designed to perform the particular measurement. This is probably the most salient characteristic of a synthetic instrument. Measurement specificity is encapsulated totally in software. The hardware does not define the measurement. An analogy to this relationship between specific measurement hardware versus generic hardware with its function totally defined in software is the relationship between specific digital circuits and a general purpose CPU. A specific digital circuit can be designed and hardwired with digital logic parts to perform a specific calculation. Alternatively, a microprocessor (or, better yet, a gate array) could be used to perform the same calculation using appropriate software. One case is specific, the other generic, with the specificity encapsulated in software. At the software level, portability of measurement description is the key attribute that distinguishes a synthetic instrument from the more commonly found instrumentation softwaresoftware that is limited to hardware scripting and data flow processing. Not all measurement related software systems inherently provide for the abstract, portable synthesis of measurements. Even if they do have such provisions, they may not typically be applied that way by users, especially if the system encourages non-abstracted access to hardware. Application software packages such as Measure Foundry and LabVIEW are typically used with explicit structural links to the natural measurements made by specific hardware and therefore usually are not synthesizing measurements from an abstract description. On the other hand, should a software system be used to synthesize measurement functions as descriptive behavioral constructs, rather than hardware referenced structural data flow descriptions, this is true measurement synthesis. An analogy here is the distinction between a non portable structural description and an abstract behavioral description of digital logic that we see in HDL systems like Verilog. Synthetic instruments in test and measurement are conceptually related to the software synthesizer in audio or music. A musical instrument synthesizer synthesizes the sound of specific instruments from generic hardware. Of course, a significant difference in these concepts is that musical instrument synthesizers typically only generate musical sound, whereas a synthetic instrument in test and measurement may be equally likely to generate or to measure some signal or parameter. A similar term commonly used in test and measurement, Virtual instrumentation, is a superset of synthetic instrumentation. All synthetic instruments are virtual instruments; however, the two terms are different when virtual instrument software mirrors and augments non-generic instrument hardware, providing a soft front panel, or managing the data flow to and from a natural instrument. In this case, the PC and accompanying software is supplementing the analysis and presentation capabilities of the natural instrument. The essential point is this: synthetic instruments are synthesized. The whole is greater than the sum of the parts. To use Buckminster Fuller's word, synthetic instruments are synergistic instruments. Like a triangle is more than three lines, synthetic instruments are more than the triangle of hardware (Control, Codec, Conditioning) they are implemented on. Therefore, one way to tell if you have a true synthetic instrument is to examine the hardware design alone and to try to figure out what sort of instrument it might be. If all you can determine are basic category facts, like the fact that it can be categorized as a stimulus or response instrument, but not anything abo

— Wikipedia

Blastwave.org

Blastwave.org

Blastwave.org was a privately held corporation specialized in building and supporting open source software packages for Oracle Solaris, as well as various operating system distributions based on OpenSolaris. As its primary product, it provides an independent software repository for Solaris in a similar manner to the repositories for Linux distributions. The objective of the Blastwave project was to allow Solaris and OpenSolaris users to freely have pre-packaged open source software in accordance with specified standards. It was created in a time when Sun hardware and Solaris tools were very expensive and thus it was difficult to create a project to support open source users. The lead design engineer for the software architecture was Philip Brown who was a member of the original six software advocates that advised Sun Microsystems Inc. to re-release Solaris on the x86 architecture. The primary financial sponsor and business lead was Dennis Clarke. The software was in SVR4-compliant package format and ready to run via the simple package utilities such as pkg-get written by Philip Brown and designed with the same sort of friendly interface as apt-get within the Debian linux project. The Blastwave project was very popular by 2007 and had many thousands of commercial users. Software quality was tightly controlled and testing was a key part of the release process. After many years of explosive growth with many software package maintainers there was disagreement within the project over how to proceed, regarding whether to continue to support Solaris 8, among other things. In late 2008 a small team of maintainers backed up all software and the maillists from Blastwave.org and forked out a project called OpenCSW taking Philip Brown with them. Within a few years, Philip Brown resigned from that project and therefore no leadership from the original Blastwave project remained. The pkg-get tool written by Phil Brown was designated as unsupported, in favour of a new open source pkgutil tool written within the OpenCSW project. A small selection of maintainers did remain with Blastwave for a few more years and they did release thousands of software package updates with the same level of testing and quality control as well as the addition of SHA256 software package manifests. Dennis clarke was elected as a member of the OpenSolaris Governance Board at the same time that Sun Microsystems Inc. was seeking a buyer for the languishing company. Ultimately Oracle Corporation purchased Sun Microsystems Inc. and then took actions to cancel the OpenSolaris project. The Blastwave project served its purpose of creating a software package base for Solaris users in a time when both the hardware and the software tools were very expensive. As of late 2012 there were no more maintainers of software at Blastwave other than Dennis Clarke himself. While being a passionate advocate for open source and free software he is often outspoken and in a rage over the legal actions taken by Oracle Corporation to close down the community created project www.wesunsolve.com he "pulled the plug" on Blastwave. The intention that Oracle Corporation and the Solaris market shall have no further free benefits from Blastwave.org Inc. The US TradeMarks were allowed to languish and the site has been shut down. The OpenCSW project remains.

— Freebase

Interactive TKO

Interactive TKO

Interactive TKO, Inc. provides a software suite for testing service-oriented architectures (SOA). The company specializes in financial solutions, software/ISV, insurance, and telco solutions, as well as documentum/EMC testing, versata platform, BEA Weblogic, and CA testing. It offers iTKO LISA, an SOA software automated testing platform that performs unit, functional, regression, load, and performance tests for Web applications, Web services, J2EE, .NET, Java objects, MS/messaging, databases, and various technologies. The company offers its product in various editions, such as LISA Enterprise SOA Testing, a software product that allows users to build and execute various phases of testing against various tier™s of SOA applications; LISA Continuous Deployment Testing, which ensures the integrity of SOA workflows at runtime and provides business continuity at SOA architecture; and LISA Server for Load & Performance, a test scheduling and network coordination of LISA tests and test suites. It also provides LISA Continuous Build Testing, an automated test staging for quality; LISA Extension Kit, a development test harness for test-enabling custom and legacy application components for repeatable testing within LISA; and LISA WS-Testing, a Web Service test authoring and execution tool for developers and QA/Business teams that support various protocols and unit/functional/regression tests. In addition, Interactive TKO offers consulting, training, and support services. The company was founded in 1999 and is based in Dallas, Texas.

— CrunchBase

Medical practice management software

Medical practice management software

Medical practice management software is a category of Healthcare Software that deals with the day-to-day operations of a medical practice. Such software frequently allows users to capture patient demographics, schedule appointments, maintain lists of insurance payers, perform billing tasks, and generate reports. In the United States, most PMS systems are designed for small to medium-sized medical offices. Some of the software is designed for or used by third-party medical billing companies. PMS is often divided amongst desktop-only software, client-server software, or Internet-based software. The desktop variety is intended to be used only on one computer by one or a handful of users sharing access. Client-server software typically necessitates that the practice acquire or lease server equipment and operate the server software on that hardware, while individual users' workstations contain client software that accesses the server. Client-server software's advantage is in allowing multiple users to share the data and the workload; a major disadvantage is the cost of running the server. Internet-based software is a relatively newer breed of PMS. Such software decreases the need for the practice to run their own server and worry about security and reliability. However, such software removes patient data from the practice's premises, which can be seen as a security risk of its own.

— Freebase

Integrated software

Integrated software

Integrated software is a software for personal computers that combines the most commonly used functions of many productivity software programs into one application. The integrated software genre has been largely overshadowed by fully functional office suites, most notably Microsoft Office, but at one time was considered the "killer application" type responsible for the rise and dominance of the IBM PC in the desktop business computing world.In the early days of the PC before GUIs became common, user interfaces were text-only and were operated mostly by function key and modifier key sequences. Every program used a different set of keystrokes, making it difficult for a user to master more than one or two programs. Programs were loaded from floppy disk, making it very slow and inconvenient to switch between programs and difficult or impossible to exchange data between them (to transfer the results from a spreadsheet to a word processor document for example). In response to these limitations, vendors created multifunction "integrated" packages, eliminating the need to switch between programs and presenting the user with a more consistent interface. The convenience of an all-in-one purchase as well as the potential for greater ease-of-use made integrated software attractive to home markets as well as business, and packages such as the original AppleWorks for the Apple II, Vizastar for the Commodore 64 and Jane for the Commodore 128 were developed in the 1980s to run on most popular home computers of the day. Commodore even produced the Plus/4 computer with a simple integrated suite built into ROM. Context MBA was an early example of the genre, and featured spreadsheet, database, chart-making, word processing and terminal emulation functions. However, because it was written in Pascal for portability, it ran slowly on the relatively underpowered systems of the day. Lotus 1-2-3, which followed it, had fewer functions but was written in x86 assembler, providing it with a speed advantage that allowed it to become the predominant business application for personal computers in the 1980s.BYTE asked in 1984, "Why should owners of advanced, multifunction business programs that are supposedly easy to use and that claim to solve all problems be compelled to purchase a utility like Sidekick? It makes you wonder about all those advertising claims." Perhaps Framework and Symphony represented the peak of integrated software products, amid questions about the genre's viability under the new graphical user interfaces. The GUI on a Macintosh or Microsoft Windows, based around a desktop metaphor and typically enforcing a set of user interface guidelines for developers, enjoyed much greater consistency between standalone applications, removing one of the main motivations behind integrated packages. Microsoft stated in 1985 that hardware limited the power of all-in-one programs, and that simultaneously using multiple applications like Excel under Switcher on the Macintosh—with common user interfaces and ability to share data—was preferable to "fully integrated" software. Jerry Pournelle agreed, adding that "it's going to be difficult to sell full integration to users. There's just too much to learn. Old hands looking for an improved text editor may not care to change spreadsheets. Newcomers almost certainly won't want to learn about spreadsheets, databases, text editors, and communications all at once." Also, "users want to be able to pick and choose programs according to their particular needs".PC Magazine said in 1993 that "reports of the death of integrated software under Windows have been greatly exaggerated", however, because the realities of software development and market considerations made integrated software still attractive to notebook owners, home and small-business users, and others. Microsoft developed its own suite, Works, for such customers, with Claris's ClarisWorks as a competitor. Developers of standalone products introduced integrated versions with additional abilities like Wordperfect Works, which was based on an earlier competitor to AppleWorks made by Beagle Bros. The 1990s also saw the rise of the office suite concept exemplified by Microsoft Office and LibreOffice, which resemble integrated software but involve more complex software with greater abilities that, in many cases, are also sold as standalone products.

— Wikipedia

Application software

Application software

Application software is all the computer software that causes a computer to perform useful tasks beyond the running of the computer itself. A specific instance of such software is called a software application, application or app. The term is used to contrast such software with system software, which manages and integrates a computer's capabilities but does not directly perform tasks that benefit the user. The system software serves the application, which in turn serves the user. Examples include enterprise software, accounting software, office suites, graphics software and media players. Many application programs deal principally with documents. Applications may be bundled with the computer and its system software or published separately, and can be coded as university projects. Application software applies the power of a particular computing platform or system software to a particular purpose. Some applications are available in versions for several different platforms; others have narrower requirements and are thus called, for example, a Geography application for Windows or an Android application for education or Linux gaming. Sometimes a new and popular application arises which only runs on one platform, increasing the desirability of that platform. This is called a killer application.

— Freebase

Linux distribution

Linux distribution

A Linux distribution (often abbreviated as distro) is an operating system made from a software collection, which is based upon the Linux kernel and, often, a package management system. Linux users usually obtain their operating system by downloading one of the Linux distributions, which are available for a wide variety of systems ranging from embedded devices (for example, OpenWrt) and personal computers (for example, Linux Mint) to powerful supercomputers (for example, Rocks Cluster Distribution). A typical Linux distribution comprises a Linux kernel, GNU tools and libraries, additional software, documentation, a window system (the most common being the X Window System), a window manager, and a desktop environment. Most of the included software is free and open-source software made available both as compiled binaries and in source code form, allowing modifications to the original software. Usually, Linux distributions optionally include some proprietary software that may not be available in source code form, such as binary blobs required for some device drivers. A Linux distribution may also be described as a particular assortment of application and utility software (various GNU tools and libraries, for example), packaged together with the Linux kernel in such a way that its capabilities meet the needs of many users. The software is usually adapted to the distribution and then packaged into software packages by the distribution's maintainers. The software packages are available online in so-called repositories, which are storage locations usually distributed around the world. Beside glue components, such as the distribution installers (for example, Debian-Installer and Anaconda) or the package management systems, there are only very few packages that are originally written from the ground up by the maintainers of a Linux distribution. Almost six hundred Linux distributions exist, with close to five hundred out of those in active development. Because of the huge availability of software, distributions have taken a wide variety of forms, including those suitable for use on desktops, servers, laptops, netbooks, mobile phones and tablets, as well as minimal environments typically for use in embedded systems. There are commercially backed distributions, such as Fedora (Red Hat), openSUSE (SUSE) and Ubuntu (Canonical Ltd.), and entirely community-driven distributions, such as Debian, Slackware, Gentoo and Arch Linux. Most distributions come ready to use and pre-compiled for a specific instruction set, while some distributions (such as Gentoo) are distributed mostly in source code form and compiled locally during installation.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. heavy
  • B. floaty
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  • D. perky