Synonyms containing star trek generations

We've found 4,128 synonyms:

Star

Star

stär, n. one of the bright bodies in the heavens, except the sun and moon: one of the heavenly bodies shining by their own light, and which keep the same relative position in the heavens: anything star-like or star-shaped: a representation of a star worn as a badge of rank or honour: a person of brilliant or attractive qualities: the chief actor or actress in a dramatic company: (print.) an asterisk (*).—v.t. to set with stars: to bespangle.—v.i. to shine, as a star: to attract attention: to appear as a star-actor (To Star it, esp. on a provincial tour):—pr.p. star′ring; pa.t. and pa.p. starred.—ns. Star′-ap′ple, the fruit of the West Indian tree Chrysophyllum Cainito; Star′-blast′ing, the noxious influence of the stars.—adjs. Star′-blind, so blind as not to see the stars: half-blind; Star′-broi′dered (Tenn.), embroidered with figures in the shape of stars.—ns. Star′-buzz′ard, an American goshawk; Star′-cat′alogue, a list of stars, with their places, magnitudes, &c.—adj. Star′-crossed, not favoured by the stars.—ns. Star′-drift, a common proper motion of a number of fixed stars in the same region of the heavens; Star′-dust, cosmic dust, matter in fine particles falling upon the earth from some outside source, like meteorites; Star′-finch, the redstart; Star′fish (Asteroidea), an Echinoderm, nearly allied to the Brittle-stars (Ophiuroidea) and to the Sea-urchins (Echinoidea); Star′-flow′er, one of various plants with bright star-shaped flowers, the Star-of-Bethlehem: chickweed; Star′-fort, a fort surrounded with projecting angles, like the points of a star; Star′-fruit, a small water-plant of southern Europe, with long-pointed radiating carpels; Star′-gāz′er, an astrologer: an astronomer; Star′-gāz′ing, astrology; Star′-grass, a grass-like plant, with star-shaped, yellow flowers; Star′-hy′acinth, a bulbous-rooted plant, a species of squill, with pinkish purple flowers, found on the coast in the south of England; Star′-jell′y, the common species of nostoc.—adj. Star′less, having no stars visible: having no light from stars.—n. Star′light, light or lustre of the stars.—adjs. Star′-like, resembling a star: radiated like a star: bright, illustrious; Star′lit, lighted by the stars.—ns. Star′-nose, a North American mole; Star′-of-Beth′lehem, a garden plant of the lily family, with bright white star-like flowers: the miraculous star of the Nativity (Matt. ii. 2, 9, 10).—adj. Star′-proof (Milt.), impervious to starlight.—n. Star′-read (Spens.), knowledge of the stars, astrology.—adj. Starred, adorned or studded with stars.—ns. Star&p

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Star Trek

Star Trek

Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment franchise created by Gene Roddenberry and currently under the ownership of CBS and Paramount. Star Trek: The Original Series and its TV spin-off shows: Star Trek: The Animated Series, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager and Star Trek: Enterprise as well as the Star Trek film franchise make up the main canon. There has also been Star Trek: The Animated Series; however, its canonicity is currently unclear. Westerns such as Wagon Train, along with the Horatio Hornblower novels and Gulliver's Travels, inspired Roddenberry when he created the first Star Trek. It followed the interstellar adventures of James T. Kirk and the crew of an exploration vessel of a 23rd-century galactic "United Federation of Planets" — the Starship Enterprise. This first series, now referred to as "The Original Series", debuted in 1966 and ran for three seasons on NBC. These adventures continued in the short-lived Star Trek: The Animated Series and six feature films. Four spin-off television series were eventually produced: Star Trek: The Next Generation, followed the crew of a new Starship Enterprise set a century after the original series; Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager, set contemporaneously with The Next Generation; and Star Trek: Enterprise, set before the original series, in the early days of human interstellar travel. Four additional The Next Generation feature films were produced. In 2009, the prequel of the original series Star Trek featuring a new cast portraying younger versions of the crew from the original Enterprise was released. A sequel to this film, Star Trek Into Darkness, premiered on May 16, 2013.

— Freebase

Sarek

Sarek

Sarek is a fictional character in the Star Trek media franchise. He is a Vulcan astrophysicist, the Vulcan ambassador to the United Federation of Planets, and father of Spock. The character was originally played by Mark Lenard in the episode "Journey to Babel" (1967) (Lenard previously portrayed a Romulan Commander in another episode of the original series, "Balance of Terror") (1966). Lenard later voiced Sarek in the animated series, and appeared in Star Trek movies and the series Star Trek: The Next Generation. Actor Jonathan Simpson played a younger Sarek in a brief scene in Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, with voice-over provided by Lenard. Ben Cross portrayed Sarek in the Star Trek reboot (2009). James Frain plays Sarek in the new television series Star Trek: Discovery. The character appears in the original Star Trek series, the animated series, four Star Trek movies, two episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Discovery and numerous Star Trek novels and comics.

— Wikipedia

USS Enterprise - D

USS Enterprise - D

The USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D) is a 24th-century starship in the Star Trek fictional universe and the principal setting of the Star Trek: The Next Generation television series. The Enterprise-D also appears in the pilot episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, the series finale of Star Trek: Enterprise, and the movie Star Trek Generations. The Enterprise-D is a Galaxy-class ship and the fifth Federation starship in the Star Trek universe to carry the name Enterprise. Enterprise-D is the flagship of Starfleet. In most of its service in the Star Trek universe, the commanding officer of Enterprise-D is Captain Jean-Luc Picard. In Star Trek Generations, after combat with the Duras sisters' ship, the ship's stardrive section was destroyed and the saucer section crash landed on the surface of the planet Veridian III. The ship was replaced by the Sovereign-class starship USS Enterprise.

— Freebase

Klingon

Klingon

Klingons are a fictional warrior race in the Star Trek universe. Klingons are recurring villains in the 1960s television series Star Trek: The Original Series, and have appeared in all five spin-off series, along with eight of the feature films. Initially intended to be antagonists for the crew of the USS Enterprise, the Klingons became a close ally of humanity and the United Federation of Planets in Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Voyager. In the 1990s series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine the United Federation of Planets briefly goes to war with the Klingons. Later in that series, the two join together with the Romulans to fight the Dominion. As originally developed by screenwriter Gene L. Coon, Klingons were darkly colored humanoids with little honor, intended as an analogy to the Cold War tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union, though Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry did not aspire to any political parallels. With a greatly expanded budget for makeup and effects, the Klingons were completely redesigned in Star Trek: The Motion Picture, gaining ridged foreheads that created a continuity error not explained by Star Trek canon until 2005. In later films and the spin-off series Star Trek: The Next Generation, the militaristic traits of the Klingons were bolstered by an increased sense of honor and strict warrior code.

— Freebase

Worf

Worf

Worf, son of Mogh (wo'rIv in the Klingon language) is a fictional character in the Star Trek franchise. He appears in the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG) and seasons four through seven of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (DS9) as well as the feature films Star Trek Generations (1994), Star Trek: First Contact (1996), Star Trek: Insurrection (1998), and Star Trek: Nemesis (2002). Worf is the first Klingon main character to appear in Star Trek, and has appeared in more Star Trek franchise episodes than any other character. He is portrayed by actor Michael Dorn.

— Wikipedia

Spock

Spock

Spock, commonly Mister Spock, is a fictional character in the Star Trek media franchise. First portrayed by Leonard Nimoy in the original Star Trek series, Spock also appears in the animated Star Trek series, two episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation, seven of the Star Trek feature films, and numerous Star Trek books, comics, and video games. In the 2009 film Star Trek, Nimoy reprised his role alongside Zachary Quinto, who played a younger, alternate-universe version of the character, and Jacob Kogan playing Spock as a child. Spock serves aboard the starship Enterprise, as science officer and first officer, and later as commanding officer of two iterations of the vessel. Spock's mixed human-Vulcan heritage serves as an important plot element in many of the character's appearances. Along with Captain James T. Kirk and Dr. Leonard "Bones" McCoy, he is one of the three central characters in the original Star Trek series and its films. After retiring from Starfleet, Spock serves as a Federation ambassador, contributing toward the détente between the Federation and the Klingon Empire. In his later years, he serves as Federation ambassador to the Romulan Empire and becomes involved in the ill-fated attempt to save Romulus from a supernova.

— Freebase

Star Trek Generations

Star Trek Generations

Star Trek Generations is a 1994 American science fiction film directed by David Carson and based on the franchise Star Trek. It is the seventh film in the Star Trek film series, and brings together cast members from the original 1960s television show and Star Trek: The Next Generation. In the film, Captain Jean-Luc Picard of the USS Enterprise-D joins forces with Captain James T. Kirk to stop a villain from destroying a solar system. Generations was conceived as a handoff from the original television series cast and their movies to The Next Generation. Writers Ronald D. Moore and Brannon Braga worked on the script concurrently with the last season of The Next Generation; production began while the series was still being shot. Parts of the film were shot at the Valley of Fire State Park, Paramount Studios, and Lone Pine, California. The film uses a mix of traditional optical effects alongside computer-generated imagery. The film's score was composed by regular Star Trek composer Dennis McCarthy. Generations opened on November 18 in the United States. Paramount promoted the film with a number of merchandising tie-ins, including toys, books, games, and a website—a first for a major motion picture. It was a box office success, grossing $118 million, but received a mixed critical reception. Generations was followed by 1996's Star Trek: First Contact, exclusively featuring the Next Generation cast.

— Wikipedia

Romulan

Romulan

The Romulans are a fictional alien race in the Star Trek universe. First appearing in the original Star Trek series in the 1966 episode "Balance of Terror", they have since made appearances in all the main later Star Trek series: The Animated Series, The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise. In addition, they have appeared in various spin-off media, and prominently in the two films Star Trek Nemesis and Star Trek. Throughout the series, they are generally depicted as antagonists, who are always at war or in an uneasy truce with the United Federation of Planets, the show's galactic organization of which Earth is a founding member. The Romulans also act as a counterpoint to the logical Vulcan race, whom they resemble and with whom they share a common ancestry. As such, the Romulans are characterized as passionate, cunning, and opportunistic — in every way the opposite of the logical Vulcans. The Romulans are the dominant race of the Romulan Star Empire. Star Trek Star Charts place the Romulan Empire into the Beta Quadrant of the galaxy, however, in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, they are referred to as an Alpha Quadrant power. The Romulans were created by Paul Schneider, who said "it was a matter of developing a good Romanesque set of admirable antagonists ... an extension of the Roman civilization to the point of space travel". There are some differences in their history and the way they are portrayed on television, in the motion pictures and in several books by Diane Duane, called the Rihannsu series, after the term they use to refer to themselves in their Romulan native language.

— Freebase

Hikaru Sulu

Hikaru Sulu

Hikaru Kato Sulu is a fictional character in the Star Trek media franchise. Originally known simply as "Sulu", he was portrayed by George Takei in the original Star Trek series. Sulu also appears in the animated Star Trek series, the first six Star Trek movies, one episode of Star Trek: Voyager, and in numerous books, comics, and video games. Sulu's first name, "Hikaru", appeared in a 1981 novel well over a decade after the original series had ended. John Cho assumed the role of the character in both the 2009 film Star Trek and its sequels, Star Trek Into Darkness and Star Trek Beyond.

— Wikipedia

Rick Berman

Rick Berman

Richard Keith Berman (born December 25, 1945) is an American television producer and screenwriter. He is best known for his work as the executive producer of several of the Star Trek television series: Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager and Star Trek: Enterprise, as well as several of the Star Trek films, and for ultimately succeeding Gene Roddenberry as head of the Star Trek franchise until the cancellation of Star Trek: Enterprise in 2005.

— Wikipedia

Jean-Luc Picard

Jean-Luc Picard

Jean-Luc Picard is a fictional character in the Star Trek franchise, most often seen as the Captain of the starship USS Enterprise-D. He appears in the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG), the feature films Star Trek Generations (1994), Star Trek: First Contact (1996), Star Trek: Insurrection (1998), and Star Trek: Nemesis (2002), and is planned to feature as the central character in an as yet untitled forthcoming Star Trek show currently in development. He is portrayed by actor Patrick Stewart.

— Wikipedia

Gene Roddenberry

Gene Roddenberry

Eugene Wesley Roddenberry (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American television screenwriter, producer and creator of the original Star Trek television series, and its first spin-off The Next Generation. Born in El Paso, Texas, Roddenberry grew up in Los Angeles, where his father was a police officer. Roddenberry flew 89 combat missions in the Army Air Forces during World War II, and worked as a commercial pilot after the war. Later, he followed in his father's footsteps and joined the Los Angeles Police Department, where he also began to write scripts for television. As a freelance writer, Roddenberry wrote scripts for Highway Patrol, Have Gun – Will Travel, and other series, before creating and producing his own television series The Lieutenant. In 1964, Roddenberry created Star Trek, which premiered in 1966 and ran for three seasons before being canceled. He then worked on other projects, including a string of failed television pilots. The syndication of Star Trek led to its growing popularity; this, in turn, resulted in the Star Trek feature films, on which Roddenberry continued to produce and consult. In 1987, the sequel series Star Trek: The Next Generation began airing on television in first-run syndication; Roddenberry was heavily involved in the initial development of the series, but took a less active role after the first season due to ill health. He continued to consult on the series until his death in 1991. In 1985, he became the first TV writer with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and he was later inducted by both the Science Fiction Hall of Fame and the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame. Years after his death, Roddenberry was one of the first humans to have his ashes carried into earth orbit. The popularity of the Star Trek universe and films has inspired films, books, comic books, video games, and fan films set in the Star Trek universe.

— Wikipedia

Khan Noonien Singh

Khan Noonien Singh

Khan Noonien Singh, commonly shortened to Khan, is a fictional character in the Star Trek science fiction franchise. The character first appeared in the Star Trek: The Original Series episode "Space Seed" (1967), and was portrayed by Ricardo Montalbán, who reprised his role in the 1982 film Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. In the 2013 film Star Trek Into Darkness, he is played by Benedict Cumberbatch. The character once controlled more than a quarter of the Earth during the Eugenics Wars of the 1990s. After being revived from suspended animation in 2267 by the crew of the Starship Enterprise, Khan attempts to capture the starship, but is thwarted by James T. Kirk and exiled on Ceti Alpha V to create a new society with his people. In Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, set fifteen years after "Space Seed", Khan escapes his exile and sets out to exact revenge upon Kirk. In Star Trek Into Darkness, set in the alternate continuity established in Star Trek (2009), Khan is awakened almost a decade before the events of "Space Seed". Khan is given the false identity "John Harrison" and coerced by Admiral Marcus into building weapons for Starfleet in exchange for the lives of Khan's crew. He ultimately rebels and comes into conflict with the crew of Enterprise.

— Wikipedia

Zefram Cochrane

Zefram Cochrane

Zefram Cochrane is a fictional character in the Star Trek universe. Created by writer Gene L. Coon, the character first appeared in the 1967 Star Trek episode "Metamorphosis", in which he was played by Glenn Corbett. James Cromwell later played Cochrane in the 1996 feature film Star Trek: First Contact and the 2001 Star Trek: Enterprise pilot, "Broken Bow". Footage of Cromwell from Star Trek: First Contact was used in the Enterprise episode "In a Mirror, Darkly (Part I)", along with new footage of an identically-dressed body double. As first mentioned in Star Trek: The Original Series, and further established by the events of Star Trek: First Contact, Cochrane is the first human to create a warp drive system, and in 2063, his successful warp speed flight draws the attention of the Vulcans, leading to humanity's first official contact with an alien race.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. chirpy
  • B. floaty
  • C. heavy
  • D. perky