Synonyms containing sun and moon in distance

We've found 366,844 synonyms:

Moon

Moon

mōōn, n. the secondary planet or satellite which revolves round the earth monthly, shining with reflected light: a satellite revolving about any other planet; a month: anything in the shape of a moon or crescent: (fort.) a crescent-shaped outwork.—v.t. to adorn with moons or crescents.—v.i. to wander about or gaze vacantly at anything.—n. Moon′beam, a beam of light from the moon.—adj. Moon′-blind, dim-sighted, purblind.—ns. Moon′calf, a monster, a deformed creature: a dolt.—n.pl. Moon′-culminā′tions, times of culmination of the limb of the moon with certain neighbouring stars, formerly used in determining longitude.—adj. Mooned, of or like the moon: having the figure of the moon marked upon it.—ns. Moon′er, one who moons about; Moon′eye, a disease affecting horses' eyes: a name of several American fishes; Moon′face, a full, round face—a point of beauty in the East.—adj. Moon′faced.—ns. Moon′-fish, a name applied to various fishes; Moon′-flower, the ox-eye daisy; Moon′-glade, the track of moonlight on water.—adj. Moon′ish, like the moon: variable: inconstant.—n. Moon′-knife, a crescent-shaped knife used by leather-workers in shaving off the fleshy parts of skins.—adj. Moon′less, destitute of moonlight.—n. Moon′light, the light of the moon—sunlight reflected from the moon's surface.—adj. lighted by the moon: occurring during moonlight.—ns. Moon′lighter, one of a band of cowardly ruffians in Ireland who committed agrarian outrages by night about 1880: a moonshiner; Moon′lighting.—adjs. Moon′lit, lit or illumined by the moon; Moon′-loved, loved by the moon.—ns. Moon′-mad′ness, lunacy, supposed to be caused by sleeping in full moonlight; Moon′-rak′er, a silly person; Moon′-rak′ing, the following of crazy fancies; Moon′-sail, a small sail, sometimes carried above the sky-scraper; Moon′-set, the setting of the moon; Moon′shine, the shining of the moon: (fig.) show without reality: poached eggs with sauce: a month: (U.S.) smuggled spirits; Moon′shiner, a smuggler or illicit distiller of spirits.—adj. Moon′shiny, lighted by the moon: visionary, unreal.—n. Moon′-stone, a variety of feldspar presenting a pearly reflection from within.—adj. Moon′struck, affected by the moon, lunatic, crazed.—n. Moon′wort, any fern of the genus Botrychium.—adj. Moon′y, relating to, or like, the moon or a crescent, bearing a crescent: round, as a shield: like moonlight, lighted by th

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sun

Sun

sun, n. the body which is the source of light and heat to our planetary system: a body which forms the centre of a system of orbs: that which resembles the sun in brightness or value: the sunshine: a revolution of the earth round the sun, a year: sunrise, day: (her.) a bearing representing the sun.—v.t. to expose to the sun's rays.—v.i. to become warm in the sunshine:—pr.p. sun′ning; pa.t. and pa.p. sunned.—n. Sun′beam, a beam or ray of the sun.—adjs. Sun′-beat, -en, smitten by the rays of the sun.—ns. Sun′-bird, a family of small tropical birds, the male with resplendent metallic plumage; Sun′-bitt′ern, a South American bird about the size of a small curlew, long-legged and long-necked, with brilliant many-coloured markings; Sun′-bonn′et, a light bonnet projecting beyond the face to protect from the sun; Sun′bow, an iris formed by the sun, esp. in the spray of a cataract; Sun′burn, a burning or scorching by the sun, esp. the browning of the skin of the face, hands, &c. exposed to the sun.—adjs. Sun′burned, Sun′burnt, burned or discoloured by the sun.—n. Sun′burst, a strong outburst of sunlight.—adj. Sun′-clad, clothed in radiant light.—ns. Sun′-crack, one of the superficial markings frequently seen on the surfaces of thin-bedded flagstones and argillaceous sandstones; Sun′dawn, the light of the dawning sun; Sun′dew, a plant of the genus Drosera, found in bogs and moist heathy ground; Sun′-dī′al, an instrument for measuring time by means of the motion of the sun's shadow cast by a style erected on its surface; Sun′-dog, a mock sun or parhelion; Sun′down, sunset: a hat with a wide brim to shade the eyes; Sun′downer, in Australia, a loafer who saunters from station to station in the interior, arriving about sundown in the hope of getting free rations and lodging for the night: a physician in government employment who practises for private fees after his official hours.—adj. Sun′-dried, dried by exposure to the sun.—ns. Sun′-fish, a fish whose body resembles the forepart of a larger fish cut short off, supposed to be so called from its nearly circular form; Sun′flower, a plant so called from its flower, which is a large disc with yellow rays; Sun′god, the sun considered as a deity; Sun′hat, a light hat with wide brim to shade the face from the sun.—adj. Sun′less, without the sun: deprived of the sun or its rays: shaded: dark.—ns. Sun′lessness; Sun′light, the light of the sun.—adjs. Sun′like, like the sun; Sun′lit, lighted up by the sun.—n. Sun′-myth, a solar myth (see Solar).—p.adj. Sunned, exposed to the sun.—n.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Moon

Moon

The Moon, occasionally distinguished as Luna, is an astronomical body that orbits the Earth as its only permanent natural satellite. It is the fifth-largest satellite in the Solar System, and the largest among planetary satellites relative to the size of the planet that it orbits (its primary). The Moon is, after Jupiter's satellite Io, the second-densest satellite in the Solar System among those whose densities are known. The Moon is thought to have formed about 4.51 billion years ago, not long after Earth. The most widely accepted explanation is that the Moon formed from the debris left over after a giant impact between Earth and a Mars-sized body called Theia. New research of moon rocks, although not rejecting the Theia hypothesis, suggests that the moon may be older than previously thought.The Moon is in synchronous rotation with Earth, and thus always shows the same side to Earth, the near side. The near side is marked by dark volcanic maria that fill the spaces between the bright ancient crustal highlands and the prominent impact craters. After the Sun, the Moon is the second-brightest regularly visible celestial object in Earth's sky. Its surface is actually dark, although compared to the night sky it appears very bright, with a reflectance just slightly higher than that of worn asphalt. Its gravitational influence produces the ocean tides, body tides, and the slight lengthening of the day. The Moon's average orbital distance is 384,402 km (238,856 mi), or 1.28 light-seconds. This is about thirty times the diameter of Earth. The Moon's apparent size in the sky is almost the same as that of the Sun, since the star is about 400 times the lunar distance and diameter. Therefore, the Moon covers the Sun nearly precisely during a total solar eclipse. This matching of apparent visual size will not continue in the far future because the Moon's distance from Earth is gradually increasing. The Moon was first reached in September 1959 by the Soviet Union's Luna 2, an unmanned spacecraft, followed by the first successful soft landing by Luna 9 in 1966. The United States' NASA Apollo program achieved the only manned lunar missions to date, beginning with the first manned orbital mission by Apollo 8 in 1968, and six manned landings between 1969 and 1972, with the first being Apollo 11 in July 1969. These missions returned lunar rocks which have been used to develop a geological understanding of the Moon's origin, internal structure, and the Moon's later history. Since the 1972 Apollo 17 mission the Moon has been visited only by unmanned spacecraft. Both the Moon's natural prominence in the earthly sky and its regular cycle of phases as seen from Earth have provided cultural references and influences for human societies and cultures since time immemorial. Such cultural influences can be found in language, lunar calendar systems, art, and mythology.

— Wikipedia

Lunar

Lunar

lū′nar, adj. belonging to the moon: measured by the revolutions of the moon: caused by the moon: like the moon—also Lū′nary.—ns. Lū′nacy, a kind of madness formerly supposed to be affected by the moon: insanity; Lunā′rian, Lū′narist, a student of lunar phenomena; Lū′nary, the moonwort fern.—adjs. Lū′nāte, -d, formed like a half-moon: crescent-shaped; Lū′natic, affected with lunacy.—n. a person so affected: a madman (De lunatico inquirendo, the title of the writ or commission for inquiry into the mental state of an alleged lunatic).—n. Lunā′tion, the time between two revolutions of the moon: a lunar month.—adjs. Lū′niform, moon-shaped; Lū′nisolar, resulting from the united action of the sun and moon: compounded of the revolution of the sun and the moon.—n. Lū′nula, a crescent-like appearance, esp. the whitish area at the base of the nails.—adjs. Lū′nulate, -d (bot.), shaped like a small crescent.—ns. Lū′nule, Lū′nulet, anything in form like a small crescent; Lū′nulite, a small circular fossil coral.—Lunar caustic, fused crystals of nitrate of silver, applied to ulcers, &c.; Lunar cycle=Metonic cycle (q.v.); Lunar month (see Month); Lunar observation, an observation of the moon's distance from a star for the purpose of finding the longitude; Lunar rainbow (see Rainbow, under Rain); Lunar theory, a term employed to denote the a priori deduction of the moon's motions from the principles of gravitation; Lunar year (see Year). [L. lunarisluna, the moonlucēre, to shine.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tide

Tide

the alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of bays, rivers, etc., connected therewith. The tide ebbs and flows twice in each lunar day, or the space of a little more than twenty-four hours. It is occasioned by the attraction of the sun and moon (the influence of the latter being three times that of the former), acting unequally on the waters in different parts of the earth, thus disturbing their equilibrium. A high tide upon one side of the earth is accompanied by a high tide upon the opposite side. Hence, when the sun and moon are in conjunction or opposition, as at new moon and full moon, their action is such as to produce a greater than the usual tide, called the spring tide, as represented in the cut. When the moon is in the first or third quarter, the sun's attraction in part counteracts the effect of the moon's attraction, thus producing under the moon a smaller tide than usual, called the neap tide

— Webster Dictionary

Solar eclipse

Solar eclipse

As seen from the Earth, a solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth, and the Moon fully or partially blocks the Sun. This can happen only at new moon, when the Sun and the Moon are in conjunction as seen from Earth in an alignment referred to as syzygy. In a total eclipse, the disk of the Sun is fully obscured by the Moon. In partial and annular eclipses only part of the Sun is obscured. If the Moon were in a perfectly circular orbit, a little closer to the Earth, and in the same orbital plane, there would be total solar eclipses every single month. However, the Moon's orbit is inclined at more than 5 degrees to Earth's orbit around the Sun so its shadow at new moon usually misses Earth. Earth's orbit is called the ecliptic plane as the Moon's orbit must cross this plane in order for an eclipse to occur. In addition, the Moon's actual orbit is elliptical, often taking it far enough away from Earth that its apparent size is not large enough to block the Sun totally. The orbital planes cross each year at a line of nodes resulting in at least two, and up to five, solar eclipses occurring each year; no more than two of which can be total eclipses. However, total solar eclipses are rare at any particular location because totality exists only along a narrow path on Earth's surface traced by the Moon's shadow or umbra.

— Freebase

Dark moon

Dark moon

The term dark moon describes the last visible crescent of a waning Moon. The duration of a dark moon varies between 1.5 and 3.5 days, depending on its ecliptic latitude. In current astronomical usage, the new moon occurs in the middle of this dark period,, when the Moon and Sun are in conjunction. This definition has entered popular usage, so that calendars will typically indicate the date of the "new moon" rather than the "dark moon". However, some argue that this term should describe the Moon during the period when it is not reflecting direct sunlight toward Earth. The period when no direct sunlight is reflected by the Moon toward Earth lasts from 21 to 26 hours. The term new moon originally referred to the crescent phase on the first night it is visible, one or two days after conjunction. Maritime records from the 19th century distinguish the dark moon (the time when only earthlight illuminates the near side of the Moon) from the new moon and waning moon.

— Wikipedia

New moon

New moon

In astronomy, new moon is the first phase of the Moon, when it lies closest to the Sun in the sky as seen from the Earth. More precisely, it is the instant when the Moon and the Sun have the same ecliptical longitude. The Moon is not normally visible at this time except when it is seen in silhouette during a solar eclipse. See the article on phases of the Moon for further details. The original meaning of the phrase new moon was the first visible crescent of the Moon, after conjunction with the Sun. This takes place over the western horizon in a brief period between sunset and moonset, and therefore the precise time and even the date of the appearance of the new moon by this definition will be influenced by the geographical location of the observer. The astronomical new moon, sometimes known as the dark moon to avoid confusion, occurs by definition at the moment of conjunction in ecliptical longitude with the Sun, when the Moon is invisible from the Earth. This moment is unique and does not depend on location, and in certain circumstances it coincides with a solar eclipse. The new moon in its original meaning of first crescent marks the beginning of the month in lunar calendars such as the Muslim calendar, and in lunisolar calendars such as the Hebrew calendar, Hindu calendars, and Buddhist calendar. But in the Chinese calendar, the beginning of the month is marked by the dark moon.

— Freebase

Solar

Solar

sō′lar, adj. pertaining to the sun: measured by the progress of the sun: produced by the sun.—n. Sōlarisā′tion, exposure to the action of the sun's rays: the effect in photography of over-exposure.—v.t. Sō′larise, to injure by exposing too long to the sun's light in a camera.—v.i. to take injury by too long exposure to the sun's light in a camera:—pr.p. sō′larīsing; pa.p. sō′larīsed.ns. Sō′larism, excessive use of solar-myths in the explanation of mythology; Sō′larist, one addicted to solarism; Sōlā′rium, a sun-dial: a place suited to receive the sun's rays—in a hospital or sanatorium; Sō′lar-mī′croscope, an apparatus for projecting upon a screen by means of sunlight an enlarged view of any object—essentially the same as the combination of lenses used in the magic-lantern taken in conjunction with a heliostat; Sō′lar-myth, a myth allegorising the course of the sun, by some mythologists constantly invoked to explain the problems of mythology; Sō′lar-print, a photographic print made in a solar camera from a negative; Sō′lar-sys′tem, the planets and comets which circle round the sun—also called Planetary-system.—Solar flowers, flowers which open and shut daily at certain hours; Solar spots=Sun-spots (see Sun); Solar time (see Time); Solar year (see Year). [L. sol, the sun, solaris, pertaining to the sun.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Evection

Evection

Evection, in astronomy, is the largest inequality produced by the action of the Sun in the monthly revolution of the Moon around the Earth. The evection, formerly called the moon's second anomaly, was approximately known in ancient times, and its discovery is attributed to Ptolemy. Evection causes the Moon's ecliptic longitude to vary by approximately ± 1.274°, with a period of about 31.8 days. The evection in longitude is given by the expression, where is the elongation, i.e. mean angular distance of the Moon from the Sun, and is the moon's mean anomaly, i.e. mean angular distance of the moon from its perigee. It can be considered as arising from an approximately 6-monthly periodic variation of the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit and a libration of similar period in the position of the Moon's perigee, caused by the action of the Sun. The evection can be considered as opposing the Moon's equation of the center at the new and full moons, and augmenting the equation of the center at the Moon's quarters. This can be seen from the combination of the principal term of the equation of the center with the evection: .

— Freebase

Social distance

Social distance

Social distance describes the distance between different groups of society and is opposed to locational distance. The notion includes all differences such as social class, race/ethnicity or sexuality, but also the fact that the different groups do not mix. The term is often applied in cities, but its use is not limited to that. In the sociological literature, the concept of social distance is conceptualized in several different ways. ⁕Affective social distance: One widespread conception of social distance focuses on affectivity. According to this approach, social distance is associated with affective distance, i.e. how much or little sympathy the members of a group feel for another group. Emory Bogardus, the creator of "Bogardus social distance scale" was typically basing his scale on this subjective-affective conception of social distance: ‘‘[i]n social distance studies the center of attention is on the feeling reactions of persons toward other persons and toward groups of people.’’ ⁕Normative social distance: A second approach views social distance as a normative category. Normative social distance refers to the widely accepted and often consciously expressed norms about who should be considered as an "insider" and who an "outsider/foreigner." Such norms, in other words, specify the distinctions between "us" and "them." In this respect, normative social distance is very different from affective social distance, because here social distance is conceived as a non-subjective, structural aspect of social relations. Examples of this conception can be found in some of the works of sociologists such as Georg Simmel, Emile Durkheim and to some extent Robert Park.

— Freebase

Earth's orbit

Earth's orbit

Earth orbits the Sun at an average distance of 149.60 million km (92.96 million mi), and one complete orbit takes 365.256 days (1 sidereal year), during which time Earth has traveled 940 million km (584 million mi). Earth's orbit has an eccentricity of 0.0167. Since the Sun constitutes 99.76% of the mass of the Sun–Earth system, the center of the orbit is extremely close to the center of the Sun. As seen from Earth, the planet's orbital prograde motion makes the Sun appear to move with respect to other stars at a rate of about 1° eastward per solar day (or a Sun or Moon diameter every 12 hours). Earth's orbital speed averages 29.78 km/s (107,208 km/h; 66,616 mph), which is fast enough to cover the planet's diameter in 7 minutes and the distance to the Moon in 4 hours.From a vantage point above the north pole of either the Sun or Earth, Earth would appear to revolve in a counterclockwise direction around the Sun. From the same vantage point, both the Earth and the Sun would appear to rotate also in a counterclockwise direction about their respective axes.

— Wikipedia

Full moon

Full moon

A full moon is the lunar phase that occurs when the Moon is completely illuminated as seen from the Earth. This occurs when the Moon is in opposition with the Sun. This means that the hemisphere of the Moon that is facing the Earth is almost fully illuminated by the Sun and appears round. Lunar eclipses can occur only at full moon, where the moon's orbit allows it to pass through the Earth's shadow. Lunar eclipses do not occur every month because the moon usually passes above or below the Earth's shadow. Lunar eclipses can occur only when the full moon occurs near the two nodes of the orbit, either the ascending or descending node. This causes eclipses to only occur about every 6 months, and often 2 weeks before or after a solar eclipse at new moon at the opposite node. The time interval between similar lunar phases—the synodic month—averages about 29.53 days. Therefore, in those lunar calendars in which each month begins on the new moon, the full moon falls on either the 14th or 15th of the lunar month. Because lunar months have a whole number of days, lunar months may be either 29 or 30 days long.

— Freebase

Eclipse

Eclipse

an interception or obscuration of the light of the sun, moon, or other luminous body, by the intervention of some other body, either between it and the eye, or between the luminous body and that illuminated by it. A lunar eclipse is caused by the moon passing through the earth's shadow; a solar eclipse, by the moon coming between the sun and the observer. A satellite is eclipsed by entering the shadow of its primary. The obscuration of a planet or star by the moon or a planet, though of the nature of an eclipse, is called an occultation. The eclipse of a small portion of the sun by Mercury or Venus is called a transit of the planet

— Webster Dictionary

Sun Tzu

Sun Tzu

Sun Tzu (; Chinese: 孫子; also rendered as Sunzi) was a Chinese general, military strategist, writer and philosopher who lived in the Eastern Zhou period of ancient China. Sun Tzu is traditionally credited as the author of The Art of War, an influential work of military strategy that has affected Western and East Asian philosophy and military thinking. His works focus much more on alternatives to battle, such as stratagem, delay, the use of spies and alternatives to war itself, the making and keeping of alliances, the uses of deceit and a willingness to submit, at least temporarily, to more powerful foes. Sun Tzu is revered in Chinese and East Asian culture as a legendary historical and military figure. His birth name was Sun Wu and he was known outside of his family by his courtesy name Changqing. The name Sun Tzu by which he is best known in the Western World is an honorific which means "Master Sun". Sun Tzu's historicity is uncertain. The Han dynasty historian Sima Qian and other traditional Chinese historians placed him as a minister to King Helü of Wu and dated his lifetime to 544–496 BC. Modern scholars accepting his historicity place the extant text of The Art of War in the later Warring States period based on its style of composition and its descriptions of warfare. Traditional accounts state that the general's descendant Sun Bin wrote a treatise on military tactics, also titled The Art of War. Since Sun Wu and Sun Bin were referred to as Sun Tzu in classical Chinese texts, some historians believed them identical, prior to the rediscovery of Sun Bin's treatise in 1972. Sun Tzu's work has been praised and employed in East Asian warfare since its composition. During the twentieth century, The Art of War grew in popularity and saw practical use in Western society as well. It continues to influence many competitive endeavors in the world, including culture, politics, business and sports, as well as modern warfare.

— Wikipedia

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
A word similar to "limited"
  • A. circumscribed
  • B. general
  • C. unqualified
  • D. immoderate