Synonyms containing terminate with extreme prejudice

We've found 31,853 synonyms:

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Contact hypothesis

Contact hypothesis

In psychology and other social sciences, the contact hypothesis suggests that intergroup contact under appropriate conditions can effectively reduce prejudice between majority and minority group members. Following WWII and the desegregation of the military and other public institutions, policymakers and social scientists had turned an eye towards the policy implications of interracial contact. Of them, social psychologist Gordon Allport united early research in this vein under intergroup contact theory. In 1954, Allport published The Nature of Prejudice, in which he outlined the most widely cited form of the hypothesis. The premise of Allport's hypothesis states that under appropriate conditions interpersonal contact could be one of the most effective ways to reduce prejudice between majority and minority group members. According to Allport, properly managed contact should reduce issues of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination that commonly occur between rival groups and lead to better intergroup interactions. In the decades following Allport's book, social scientists expanded and applied the contact hypothesis towards the reduction of prejudice beyond racism, including prejudice towards physically and mentally disabled people, women, and LGB< people, in hundreds of different studies.In some subfields of criminology, psychology, and sociology, intergroup contact has been described as one of the best ways to improve relations among groups in conflict. Nonetheless, the effects of intergroup contact vary widely from context to context, and empirical inquiry continues to this day.

— Wikipedia

DESPERATE

DESPERATE

If you are desperate, you are in such a bad situation that you are willing to try anything to change it.done because you can think of no other way;reckless or dangerous because of despair, hopelessness, or urgency;very worried and angry because you do not know how to deal with an unpleasant situation;needing or wanting something very much;A desperate person is willing to take any measures and may be dangerous:showing a willingness to take any risk in order to change a bad or dangerous situation; feeling that you have no hope and are ready to do anything to change the bad situation you are in;Having lost all hope:despairing, despondent, forlorn, hopeless. so serious as to be at the point of crisis or necessary to resolve a crisis: grave, great, pressing, serious, critical, acute, severe, extreme, urgent, dire, drastic, very grave,climacteric,crucial. Extreme in degree, strength, or effect:fierce, last-ditch, dangerous, daring, determined, wild, violent, furious, last-minute, risky, frantic, rash, hazardous, precipitate, last-resort, hasty, audacious, madcap, foolhardy, eleventh-hour, headstrong, impetuous, death-defying,intense, terrible, vehement,violent,extremely severe or serious;giving no ground for hope,moved by despair or utter loss of hope, involving or employing extreme measures in an attempt to escape defeat or frustration, suffering extreme need or anxiety,involving extreme danger or possible disaster,of extreme intensity,having a very great need;SHOCKING, OUTRAGEOUS ,despairing, despondent, forlorn, hopeless,in despair,abject ,dejected ,demoralized ,wretched ,disconsolate ,inconsolable ,downhearted ,at the end of your tether.

— Editors Contribution

Extreme Prejudice

Extreme Prejudice

Extreme Prejudice is an American action film starring Nick Nolte and Powers Boothe, originally released in 1987. The film was directed by Walter Hill; it was written by John Milius, Fred Rexer and Deric Washburn. Extreme Prejudice is an homage, of sorts, to The Wild Bunch, a western directed by Sam Peckinpah, with whom Hill worked on The Getaway. Both films end with a massive gunfight in a Mexican border town. The title originates from "terminate with extreme prejudice", a phrase popularized by the 1979 film Apocalypse Now, also written by John Milius. The character of Jack Benteen was loosely based on Joaquin Jackson, now a retired Texas Ranger. Nolte spent three weeks in Texas with Jackson learning the day to day activities of a Ranger. Nolte took what he learned and incorporated it into his character; the mannerisms and dress.

— Freebase

Extreme sport

Extreme sport

Extreme sports is a popular term for certain activities perceived as having a high level of inherent danger. These activities often involve speed, height, a high level of physical exertion, and highly specialized gear. The definition of an extreme sport is not exact and the origin of the term is unclear, but it gained popularity in the 1990s when it was picked up by marketing companies to promote the X Games. While use of the term "extreme sport" has spread far and wide to describe a multitude of different activities, exactly which sports are considered 'extreme' is debatable. There are however several characteristics common to most extreme sports. While not the exclusive domain of youth, extreme sports tend to have a younger-than-average target demographic. Extreme sports are rarely sanctioned by schools. Extreme sports tend to be more solitary than traditional sports . In addition, beginning extreme athletes tend to work on their craft without the guidance of a coach. Activities categorized by media as extreme sports differ from traditional sports due to the higher number of inherently uncontrollable variables. These environmental variables are frequently weather and terrain related, including wind, snow, water and mountains. Because these natural phenomena cannot be controlled, they inevitably affect the outcome of the given activity or event.

— Freebase

Extreme weather

Extreme weather

Extreme weather or extreme climate events includes unexpected, unusual, severe, or unseasonal weather; weather at the extremes of the historical distribution—the range that has been seen in the past. Often, extreme events are based on a location's recorded weather history and defined as lying in the most unusual ten percent.In recent years, growing evidence suggests that human-induced global warming is increasing the periodicity and intensity of some extreme weather events. Confidence in the attribution of extreme weather and other events to anthropocentric climate change is highest in changes in frequency or magnitude of extreme heat and cold events with some confidence in increases in heavy precipitation and increases in intensity of droughts.Extreme weather has significant impacts on human society as well natural ecosystems. For example, global insurer Munich Re estimates that natural disasters cause more than $90 billion global direct losses in 2015.

— Wikipedia

antigoyism

antigoyism

a prejudice towards non-Jews. In an extreme interpretation, this form of prejudice holds that Jews have a superior position religious or secular.

— Wiktionary

Silicon Space Technology

Silicon Space Technology

Silicon Space Technology (SST) is a privately held, fabless semiconductor company founded in 2004 and based in Austin, TX. SST's patented, innovative technology, HardSIL™, has been proven in multiple CMOS process generations at multiple fabs to harden integrated circuits without redesign and is scalable to any generation node. Once modified by HardSIL™, the commercial process flow can be used to manufacture significantly more robust CMOS circuits for highly reliable operation in extreme environments - such as radiation and high temperature. This capability to dramatically enhance the hardness and reliability of high density ICs provides a disruptive alternative to current hi-rel approaches utilizing upscreened COTS, redundant systems, or exotic packaging.By incorporating HardSIL™ into IC designs, SST provides its customers with unique material treatment services during the actual semiconductor manufacturing process. Using astute semiconductor substrate engineering, the resulting IC designs contain enhanced electrical isolation that inherently protect electronic components from the effects of extreme radiation or extreme temperature.Incorporating their patented HardSIL™ technology into their own designs and several Texas Instruments products spanning multiple process generations, SST has successfully demonstrated superior hardening in a number of devices including high density SRAMs and DSPs. Because the technology is applied at the CMOS process-level, no performance, power or circuit size trade-offs are required. As a result, hardened IC components for extreme environments are now within reach for system designers; a solution with the highest performance in reduced form factors while using much less power.Partnering with Texas Instruments, Silicon Space Technology introduced its first product, a QMLV, space-qualified rad hard 16Mb SRAM, during 2012. This product is the only rad hard SRAM offering to combine superior radiation hardening with no trade-offs in performance. Incorporating on-chip EDAC and Scrub, the SEU immune SRAM is also latch-up immune, radiation hardened to 1Mrad TID, and the lowest power 16Mb SRAM available for space applications.Now also partnering with GLOBALFOUNDRIES as a second manufacturing source, SST is developing new products incorporating HardSIL™ to provide an expanding product portfolio for extreme environment electronic applications.

— CrunchBase

Prejudice

Prejudice

prej′ū-dis, n. a judgment or opinion formed beforehand or without due examination: a prejudgment: unreasonable prepossession for or against anything: bias: injury or wrong of any kind: disadvantage: mischief.—v.t. to fill with prejudice: to cause a prejudice against: to prepossess: to bias the mind of: to injure or hurt.—adj. Prejudi′cial, causing prejudice or injury: disadvantageous: injurious: mischievous: tending to obstruct.—adv. Prejudi′cially.—n. Prejudi′cialness. [O. Fr.,—L. præjudiciumpræ, before, judicium, judgment.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Terminate

Terminate

Terminate was a shareware modem terminal and host program for MS-DOS and compatible operating systems developed from the early to the late 1990s by the Dane Bo Bendtsen. The last release was made in 1997; no details are available for the first, but the T-Cfg program which performed config upgrades from 1.0 to 1.1 is dated 1994, so it seems reasonable to assume 1.0 was not that much earlier. Compared to similar programs of its time, Terminate had a large number of built-in features like: a powerful phone book with long distance calling cost calculation, Fido Mailer, QWK offline mail reader, file manager, text editor, keyboard mapping, ISDN support, fax and voice-call features, chat, IEMSI, VGA mode detection, audio CD player, and a REXX-like scripting language. Supported terminal emulation modes included ASCII, Avatar, ANSI, RIP, VT102, and others. A number of file transfer protocols like Zmodem were built into the application, along with support for external protocols like HS/Link and BiModem. The built-in support for advanced file transfer protocols made Terminate very popular at the time. The installation program could import the phone book and settings from other applications like: Telix, RemoteAccess, Frontdoor, BinkleyTerm, Portal of Power, as well as Minicom and Commo.

— Freebase

Terminate with extreme prejudice

Terminate with extreme prejudice

In military and other covert operations, terminate with extreme prejudice is a euphemism for aggressive execution. In a military intelligence context, it is generally understood as an order to assassinate. Its meaning was explained in a New York Times report on an incident during the Vietnam War. According to Douglas Valentine in his book The Phoenix Program, the Central Intelligence Agency routinely used the term during the Vietnam War when firing its locally hired operatives. In cases of extreme misconduct, an assassination was ordered.

— Freebase

Prejudice

Prejudice

The word prejudice refers to prejudgment: i.e. making a decision before becoming aware of the relevant facts of a case. In recent times, the word has come to be most often used to refer to preconceived, usually unfavorable, judgments toward people or a person because of gender, social class, age, disability, religion, sexuality, race/ethnicity, language, nationality or other personal characteristics. In this case it refers to a positive or negative evaluation of another person based on their group membership. Prejudice can also refer to unfounded beliefs and may include "any unreasonable attitude that is unusually resistant to rational influence." Gordon Allport defined prejudice as a "feeling, favorable or unfavorable, toward a person or thing, prior to, or not based on, actual experience."

— Freebase

Motion to pass on

Motion to pass on

The motion to pass on is a dilatory parliamentary motion used in legislative procedure. It is distinct from the motion to table or to postpone to a certain time. The motion delays consideration of a matter for a later time without indicating prejudice with respect to it. According to Mason's Manual, matter passed on in this way remains subject to subsidiary motion. The motion to pass on is not subject to debate, but requires a majority vote. In the United States House of Representatives, during the call for private bills, this motion is often put as a request for unanimous consent. For example, during consideration of a bill, the following dialogue may occur: ⁕Member: Mr./Madam Speaker. ⁕The Speaker: For what purpose does the gentleman/gentlewoman from rise? ⁕Member: Mr./Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the bill H.R./S. ____ be passed over without prejudice. ⁕Speaker: Without objection, the bill is passed over without prejudice.

— Freebase

Extreme weather

Extreme weather

Extreme weather includes unusual, severe or unseasonal weather; weather at the extremes of the historical distribution—the range that has been seen in the past. The most commonly used definition of extreme weather is based on an event's climatological distribution: Extreme weather occurs only 5% or less of the time. According to climate scientists and meteorological researchers, extreme weather events have been rare. Some extreme weather events have been attributed to man-made global warming, with a 2012 studies indicating an increasing threat from extreme weather.

— Freebase

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A synonym for "drooping"
  • A. erect
  • B. upright
  • C. tense
  • D. sagging