Synonyms containing trade agreement

We've found 8,922 synonyms:

Security agreement

Security agreement

A security agreement, in the law of the United States, is a contract that governs the relationship between the parties to a kind of financial transaction known as a secured transaction. In a secured transaction, the Grantor (typically a borrower but possibly a guarantor or surety) assigns, grants and pledges to the grantee (typically the lender) a security interest in personal property which is referred to as the collateral. Examples of typical collateral are shares of stock, livestock, and vehicles. A security agreement is not used to transfer any interest in real property (land/real estate), only personal property. The document used by lenders to obtain a lien on real property is a mortgage or deed of trust. The security agreement sets out the various rights the grantee will have with respect to the collateral, which are in addition to all other rights which the lender may have by law, such as those rights contained in Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code which has been adopted in some form by each state in the United States. The Security Agreement also addresses issues such as permitted sales or other transactions with the collateral in the ordinary course of the grantor's business and notices that may be required to be given by the grantee to the grantor if certain actions are taken. There are many forms available for purchase from legal supply and banker supply companies, in addition to software that will produce a security agreement according to specific user input. A security agreement may be oral if the secured party (the lender) has actual physical possession of the collateral. Where the collateral remains in the physical possession of the borrower, or where the collateral is intangible (such as a patent., accounts receivable, or a promissory note), the security agreement must be in writing in order to satisfy the statute of frauds. The security agreement must be authenticated by the debtor, meaning that it must either bear the debtor's signature, or it must be electronically marked. It must contain a reasonable description of the collateral, and must use words showing an intent to create a security interest (the right to seek repayment of the loan by foreclosing on the collateral). In order for the security agreement to be valid, the borrower must usually have rights in the collateral at the time the agreement is executed. If a borrower pledges as collateral a car owned by a neighbor, and the neighbor does not know of and endorse this pledge, then the security agreement is ineffective. However, a security agreement may specify that it includes after-acquired property. If such a specification is included, then a pledge of "all automobiles owned by borrower" would include the neighbor's car if the borrower were to buy that car from the neighbor. In order for a security interest to attach to the collateral in the possession of subsequent purchasers, it must be perfected. If the security agreement is for a purchase money security interest in consumer goods, perfection is automatic. Otherwise, the lender must record either the agreement itself, or a UCC-1 financing statement, in an appropriate public venue (usually the state secretary of state or a state business commission under that person's authority). Perfecting the interest creates constructive notice, which is deemed legally sufficient to inform the rest of the world of the lender's rights in the collateral. Where a borrower has used the same property as collateral with respect to multiple security agreements made with different lenders, the first lender to record the interest has the strongest claim to that property. Under Dutch (Netherlands) law, the Dutch Civil Code describes suretyship as an agreement in which a third party undertakes towards a contractual creditor to perform the contractual obligations of a debtor. Such a suretyship agreement is entered into between the surety and the creditor. The debtor of the secured obligation is not required to be a party to such an agreement. It is even thinkable that such a surety agreement is entered into without the knowledge or consent of the debtor. Article 7:850 of the Dutch Civil Code states: 1. A surety agreement is an agreement under which one of the parties ('the surety') has engaged himself towards the other party ('the creditor') to perform an obligation which a third party ('the principal debtor') is or will be due to the creditor. 2. For the validity of a surety agreement it is not required that the principal debtor is aware of the existence of the involved suretyship. 3. The statutory provisions for joint and several obligations apply to a surety agreement as far as the provisions of the present Title do not derogate from them. Regarding the nature of the obligation secured with a suretyship agreement under Dutch law, article 7:854 of the Dutch Civil Code provides: Where the object of the secured obligation of the principal debtor is another performance than the payment of a sum of

— Wikipedia

Trade

Trade

trād, n. buying and selling: commerce: occupation, craft; men engaged in the same occupation: rubbish.—v.i. to buy and sell: to act merely for money.—v.i. to traffic with.—adjs. Trād′ed (Shak.), versed, practised; Trade′ful (Spens.), commercial, busy in traffic.—ns. Trade′-hall, a hall for the meetings of any trade or guild; Trade′-mark, any name or distinctive device warranting goods for sale as the production of any individual or firm; Trade′-price, the price at which goods are sold to members of the same trade, or are sold by wholesale to retail dealers; Trā′der; Trade′-sale, an auction sale of goods by producers, &c., to persons in the trade.—n.pl. Trades′-folk, people employed in trade.—n. Trades′man, a common name for a shopkeeper: a mechanic:—fem. Trades′woman.—n.pl. Trades′peo′ple, people employed in various trades, esp. shopkeeping, &c.—ns. Trades′-un′ion, Trade′-un′ion, an organised association of the workmen of any trade or industry for the protection of their common interests; Trade′-un′ionism; Trade′-un′ionist; Trade′-wind, a wind blowing steadily toward the thermal equator and deflected westwardly by the eastward rotation of the earth.—adj. Trā′ding, carrying on commerce (also n.): (Milt.) frequented by traders, denoting places where the trade-winds blow.—Trade on, to take advantage of.—Board of Trade, a department of government for control of railways, mercantile marine, harbours, and commercial matters generally. [A.S. træd, pa.t. of tredan, to tread. Not Fr. traite, transport of goods—L. tractāre, freq. of trahĕre, to draw.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Trans-Pacific Partnership

Trans-Pacific Partnership

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), also called the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, was a proposed trade agreement between Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, Vietnam, and the United States signed on 4 February 2016. After the newly elected US president Donald Trump withdrew the US signature from TPP in January 2017, the agreement could not be ratified as required and did not enter into force. The remaining countries negotiated a new trade agreement called Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, which incorporates most of the provisions of the TPP and which entered into force on 30 December 2018. The TPP began as an expansion of the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement (TPSEP or P4) signed by Brunei, Chile, New Zealand and Singapore in 2005. Beginning in 2008, additional countries joined the discussion for a broader agreement: Australia, Canada, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, the United States, and Vietnam, bringing the negotiating countries to twelve. In January 2017, the United States withdrew from the agreement. The other 11 TPP countries agreed in May 2017 to revive it and reached agreement in January 2018. In March 2018, the 11 countries signed the revised version of the agreement, called Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership. After ratification by six of them (Australia, Canada, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Singapore), the agreement came into force for those countries on 30 December 2018. The original TPP contained measures to lower both non-tariff and tariff barriers to trade, and establish an investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism. The U.S. International Trade Commission, the Peterson Institute for International Economics, the World Bank and the Office of the Chief Economist at Global Affairs Canada found the final agreement would, if ratified, lead to net positive economic outcomes for all signatories, while an analysis using an alternative methodology by two Tufts University economists found the agreement would adversely affect the signatories. Many observers have argued the trade deal would have served a geopolitical purpose, namely to reduce the signatories' dependence on Chinese trade and bring the signatories closer to the United States.

— Wikipedia

Economic Cooperation Organization

Economic Cooperation Organization

The Economic Cooperation Organization or ECO is an Asian political and economic intergovernmental organization which was founded in 1985 in Tehran by the leaders of Iran, Pakistan, and Turkey. It provides a platform to discuss ways to improve development and promote trade and investment opportunities. The ECO is an ad hoc organisation under the United Nations Charter. The objective is to establish a single market for goods and services, much like the European Union. The ECO's secretariat and cultural department are located in Iran, its economic bureau is in Turkey and its scientific bureau is situated in Pakistan. The nature of the ECO is that it consists of predominantly Muslim-majority states as it is a trade bloc for the Central Asian states connected to the Mediterranean through Turkey, to the Persian Gulf via Iran, and to the Arabian sea via Pakistan. The current framework of the ECO expresses itself mostly in the form of bilateral agreements and arbitration mechanisms between individual and fully sovereign member states. This makes the ECO similar to ASEAN in that it is an organisation that has its own offices and bureaucracy for implementation of trade amongst sovereign member states. This consists of the historically integrated agricultural region of the Ferghana Valley which allows for trade and common agricultural production in the border region of Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. Free trade agreements between the industrial nations of Iran and Turkey are due to be signed in 2017. Likewise the Pakistan-Turkey Free Trade Agreement is due to be signed. Pakistan has free trade agreements with both Afghanistan and Iran which are signed and are in the process of implementation, and currently most of Afghanistan trade is through Pakistan. And the Afghanistan-Pakistan Transit Trade Agreement is designed to facilitate trade for goods and services for Central Asia via both Afghanistan and Pakistan. This is in addition to the Ashgabat agreement which is a multi-modal transport agreement between the Central Asian states.Further cooperation amongst members is planned in the form of the Iran–Pakistan gas pipeline, as well as a Turkmenistan–Afghanistan–Pakistan pipeline. Current pipelines include the Tabriz–Ankara pipeline in addition to the planned Persian Pipeline. This is in addition to the transportation of oil and gas from resource rich Central Asian states such as Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan of minerals and agriculture that complements the industrialisation underway in Iran, Pakistan and Turkey. Pakistan plans to diversify its source of oil and gas supplies towards the Central Asian states including petroleum import contracts with Azerbaijan.

— Wikipedia

Trade barrier

Trade barrier

Trade barriers are government-induced restrictions on international trade. The barriers can take many forms, including the following: ⁕Tariffs ⁕Non-tariff barriers to trade ⁕Import licenses ⁕Export licenses ⁕Import quotas ⁕Subsidies ⁕Voluntary Export Restraints ⁕Local content requirements ⁕Embargo ⁕Currency devaluation ⁕Trade restriction Most trade barriers work on the same principle: the imposition of some sort of cost on trade that raises the price of the traded products. If two or more nations repeatedly use trade barriers against each other, then a trade war results. Economists generally agree that trade barriers are detrimental and decrease overall economic efficiency, this can be explained by the theory of comparative advantage. In theory, free trade involves the removal of all such barriers, except perhaps those considered necessary for health or national security. In practice, however, even those countries promoting free trade heavily subsidize certain industries, such as agriculture and steel. Trade barriers are often criticized for the effect they have on the developing world. Because rich-country players call most of the shots and set trade policies, goods such as crops that developing countries are best at producing still face high barriers. Trade barriers such as taxes on food imports or subsidies for farmers in developed economies lead to overproduction and dumping on world markets, thus lowering prices and hurting poor-country farmers. Tariffs also tend to be anti-poor, with low rates for raw commodities and high rates for labor-intensive processed goods. The Commitment to Development Index measures the effect that rich country trade policies actually have on the developing world.

— Freebase

European Economic Area

European Economic Area

The European Economic Area (EEA) was established via the Agreement on the European Economic Area, an international agreement which enables the extension of the European Union's single market to member states of the European Free Trade Association. The EEA links the EU member states and three EFTA states (Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway) into an internal market governed by the same basic rules. The United Kingdom benefits from this relationship during the transition/implementation period planned by the treaties. These rules aim to enable free movement of persons, goods, services, and capital within the European Single Market, including the freedom to choose residence in any country within this area. The EEA was established on 1 January 1994 upon entry into force of the EEA Agreement. The contracting parties are the EU, its member states, and Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and the United Kingdom.The EEA Treaty is a commercial treaty and differs from the EU Treaties in certain key respects. According to Article 1 its purpose is to "promote a continuous and balanced strengthening of trade and economic relation". The EFTA members do not participate in the Common Agricultural Policy or the Common Fisheries Policy. The right to free movement of persons between EEA member states and the relevant provisions on safeguard measures are identical to those applying between members of the EU. The right and rules applicable in all EEA member states, including those which are not members of the EU, are specified in Directive 2004/38/EC and in the EEA Agreement.The EEA Agreement specifies that membership is open to member states either of the EU or of the EFTA. EFTA states that are party to the EEA Agreement participate in the EU's internal market without being members of the EU or the European Union Customs Union. They adopt most EU legislation concerning the single market, with notable exclusions including laws regarding the Common Agricultural Policy and Common Fisheries Policy. The EEA's "decision-shaping" processes enable EEA EFTA member states to influence and contribute to new EEA policy and legislation from an early stage. Third country goods are excluded for these states on rules of origin. When entering into force in 1994, the EEA parties were 17 states and two European Communities: the European Community, which was later absorbed into the EU's wider framework, and the now defunct European Coal and Steel Community. Membership has grown to 30 states as of 2020: 27 EU member states, as well as three of the four member states of the EFTA (Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway). The Agreement is applied provisionally with respect to Croatia—the remaining and most recent EU member state—pending ratification of its accession by all EEA parties. The United Kingdom transitionally continues to be an EEA member after it withdrew from the EU on 31 January 2020, and entered into a transition period ending 31 December 2020. During the transition, the EEA agreement will remain unchanged, and continue to apply as before, to both the remaining EEA members and the United Kingdom, as the UK will continue to be treated as if an EEA state. One EFTA member, Switzerland, has not joined the EEA, but has a set of bilateral sectoral agreements with the EU which allow it to participate in the internal market.

— Wikipedia

Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership

Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is a proposed trade agreement between the European Union and the United States, with the aim of promoting trade and multilateral economic growth. According to Karel de Gucht, European Commissioner for Trade between 2010 and 2014, the TTIP is the largest bilateral trade initiative ever negotiated, not only because it involves the two largest economies in the world but also "because of its potential global reach in setting an example for future partners and agreements".Negotiations were halted by President Donald Trump, who then initiated a trade conflict with the EU. Trump and the EU declared a truce of sorts in July 2018, resuming talks that appeared similar to TTIP. On 15 April 2019, the negotiations have been declared "obsolete and no longer relevant" by the European Commission.The reports on the ongoing negotiations and the contents of the negotiated TTIP proposals are classified from the public, and can be accessed only by authorised persons. Multiple leaks of proposed TTIP contents into the public caused controversy.The European Commission says that the TTIP would boost the EU's economy by €120 billion, the US economy by €90 billion and the rest of the world by €100 billion. According to Anu Bradford, law professor at Columbia Law School, and Thomas J. Bollyky of the Council on Foreign Relations, TTIP aims to "liberalise one-third of global trade" and could create millions of new jobs. A Guardian article by Dean Baker of the US thinktank Center for Economic and Policy Research argued that the economic benefits per household would be relatively small. According to a European Parliament report, impacts on labour conditions range from job gains to job losses, depending on economic model and assumptions used for predictions.The agreement has been criticized and opposed by some unions, charities, NGOs and environmentalists, particularly in Europe. The Independent describes common criticisms of TTIP as "reducing the regulatory barriers to trade for big business, things like food safety law, environmental legislation, banking regulations and the sovereign powers of individual nations", or more critically as an "assault on European and US societies by transnational corporations". The Guardian noted the criticism of TTIP's "undemocratic nature of the closed-door talks", "influence of powerful lobbyists", TTIP's potential ability to "undermine the democratic authority of local government", and described it as "the most controversial trade deal the EU has ever negotiated". German economist Max Otte argued that by putting European workers into direct competition with Americans (and in effect, because of the North American Free Trade Agreement, with Mexicans and Canadians), TTIP would negatively impact the European social models. An EU direct democracy mechanism, the European Citizens' Initiative, which enables EU citizens to call directly on the European Commission to propose a legal act, acquired over 3.2 million signatures against TTIP and CETA within a year.

— Wikipedia

accessible trade agreement

accessible trade agreement

An intergovernmental legal accessible trade agreement in the form of an accessible trade agreement or treaty with the accurate and specific details for how countries choose to trade together, the type of investment provided by each country where appropriate, the range and type of products from each country which may be imported and exported to the other created on the principles of accessible trade and accessible entry to trade and markets which are just, fair, accessible and transparent. The trade negotiation team choose to focus on creating optimum health, human rights, right to life, shared prosperity for all, stability, unity government, solidarity, cohesion, animal rights, right to housing, right to education, right to be a parent, right to childcare, right to a standard of living, right to internet access, economic stability, financial stability, civil rights, equal rights, equal opportunities, employment rights, childrens rights, sustainable development, sustainable development goals, united partnership, multi-party working, community empowerment systems, equal distribution of income, wealth, fairness and justness across society, the country, europe and the world and contribute to the cocreation of global and national peace agreements, peace treaties, the universes truth and a fair, just and transparent system of checks and balances.

— Editors Contribution

Agency agreement

Agency agreement

An agency agreement is a legal contract creating a fiduciary relationship whereby the first party ("the principal") agrees that the actions of a second party ("the agent") binds the principal to later agreements made by the agent as if the principal had himself personally made the later agreements. The power of the agent to bind the principal is usually legally referred to as authority. Agency created via an agreement may be a form of implied authority, such as when a person gives their credit card to a close relative, the cardholder may be required to pay for purchases made by the relative with their credit card. Many states employ the equal dignity rule whereby the agency agreement must be in writing if the later agreement would also necessarily be written, such as a contract to buy thousands of dollars' worth of goods. An example of the existence of an agency agreement at issue in a 2006 court case arose when a tennis tournament sponsor sued Venus and Serena Williams for not participating. The sponsor argued that their father, Richard Williams, had committed to their participation in the tournament. The Williams sisters argued that their father did not have the authority to bind them to such an agreement. If their father did commit the sisters to play, the issue for the court to decide is whether a valid agency agreement existed between the Williams sisters and their father. If not, then they likely were not bound to his agreement under the law of agency.Manufacturers and suppliers of goods frequently appoint agents to act on their behalf in promoting sales, both in the home country of the manufacturer as well as overseas. A formal agreement is usually signed setting out the commission the agent will receive, the territory, duration and other terms on which the principal and agent will do business together. Within the European Union, there is legislation designed to give some protection to agents, in particular the right to compensation in certain circumstances when an agency is terminated. The same applies in other parts of the world and in some countries it is necessary for a foreign manufacturer to appoint as agent an individual or company that is a national of the country where the agency will operate. An agent should be distinguished from a distributor—in commercial parlance, a distributor will buy stock from the supplier or principal and then sell it on to his customers at a mark-up, whereas an agent will find customers for the principal who then sells direct to the customers and pays commission to the agent.

— Wikipedia

Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures

Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures

The Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures, also known as the SPS Agreement or just SPS, is an international treaty of the World Trade Organization (WTO). It was negotiated during the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), and entered into force with the establishment of the WTO at the beginning of 1995. Broadly, the sanitary and phytosanitary ("SPS") measures covered by the agreement are those aimed at the protection of human, animal or plant life or health from certain risks.Under the SPS agreement, the WTO sets constraints on member-states' policies relating to food safety (bacterial contaminants, pesticides, inspection and labelling) as well as animal and plant health (phytosanitation) with respect to imported pests and diseases. There are 3 standards organizations who set standards that WTO members should base their SPS methodologies on. As provided for in Article 3, they are the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex), World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Secretariat of the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC). The SPS agreement is closely linked to the Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade, which was signed in the same year and has similar goals. The TBT Emerged from the Tokyo Round of WTO negotiations and was negotiated with the aim of ensuring non-discrimination in the adoption and implementation of technical regulations and standards.

— Wikipedia

Free trade

Free trade

Free trade is a policy by which a government does not discriminate against imports or interfere with exports by applying tariffs or subsidies or quotas. According to the law of comparative advantage, the policy permits trading partners mutual gains from trade of goods and services. Under a free trade policy, prices emerge from the equilibration of supply and demand, and are the sole determinant of resource allocation. 'Free' trade differs from other forms of trade policy where the allocation of goods and services among trading countries are determined by price strategies that may differ from those that would emerge under deregulation. These governed prices are the result of government intervention in the market through price adjustments or supply restrictions, including protectionist policies. Such government interventions can increase as well as decrease the cost of goods and services to both consumers and producers. Since the mid-20th century, nations have increasingly reduced tariff barriers and currency restrictions on international trade. Other barriers, however, that may be equally effective in hindering trade include import quotas, taxes, and diverse means of subsidizing domestic industries. Interventions include subsidies, taxes and tariffs, non-tariff barriers, such as regulatory legislation and import quotas, and even inter-government managed trade agreements such as the North American Free Trade Agreement and Central America Free Trade Agreement and any governmental market intervention resulting in artificial prices.

— Freebase

World Trade Organization

World Trade Organization

The World Trade Organization is an organization that intends to supervise and liberalize international trade. The organization officially commenced on 1 January 1995 under the Marrakech Agreement, replacing the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, which commenced in 1948. The organization deals with regulation of trade between participating countries; it provides a framework for negotiating and formalizing trade agreements, and a dispute resolution process aimed at enforcing participants' adherence to WTO agreements, which are signed by representatives of member governments and ratified by their parliaments. Most of the issues that the WTO focuses on derive from previous trade negotiations, especially from the Uruguay Round. The organization is attempting to complete negotiations on the Doha Development Round, which was launched in 2001 with an explicit focus on addressing the needs of developing countries. As of June 2012, the future of the Doha Round remains uncertain: the work programme lists 21 subjects in which the original deadline of 1 January 2005 was missed, and the round is still incomplete. The conflict between free trade on industrial goods and services but retention of protectionism on farm subsidies to domestic agricultural sector and the substantiation of the international liberalization of fair trade on agricultural products remain the major obstacles. These points of contention have hindered any progress to launch new WTO negotiations beyond the Doha Development Round. As a result of this impasse, there has been an increasing number of bilateral free trade agreements signed. As of July 2012, there are various negotiation groups in the WTO system for the current agricultural trade negotiation which is in the condition of stalemate.

— Freebase

North American Free Trade Agreement

North American Free Trade Agreement

The North American Free Trade Agreement is an agreement signed by Canada, Mexico, and the United States, creating a trilateral trade bloc in North America. The agreement came into force on January 1, 1994. It superseded the Canada–United States Free Trade Agreement between the U.S. and Canada. NAFTA has two supplements: the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation and the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation.

— Freebase

Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement

Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement

The Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement (TPSEP) is a trade agreement between four Pacific Rim countries concerning a variety of matters of economic policy. The agreement was signed by Brunei, Chile, Singapore and New Zealand in 2005 and entered into force in 2006. It is a comprehensive trade agreement, affecting trade in goods, rules of origin, trade remedies, sanitary and phytosanitary measures, technical barriers to trade, trade in services, intellectual property, government procurement and competition policy. Among other things, it called for reduction by 90 percent of all tariffs between member countries by 1 January 2006, and reduction of all trade tariffs to zero by the year 2015.

— Wikipedia

Franchise agreement

Franchise agreement

A Franchise Agreement is a legal, binding contract between a franchisor and franchisee. In the United States franchise agreements are enforced at the State level. Prior to a franchisee signing a contract, the US Federal Trade Commission regulates information disclosures under the authority of The Franchise Rule. The Franchise Rule requires a franchisee be supplied a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD ) (originally called Uniform Franchise Offering Circular (UFOC )) prior to signing a franchise agreement, a minimum of fourteen days before signing a franchise agreement.Once the Federal ten-day waiting period has passed, the Franchise Agreement becomes a State level jurisdiction document. Each state has unique laws regarding franchise agreements. A franchise agreement contents can vary significantly in content depending upon the franchise system, the state jurisdiction of the franchisor, franchisee, and arbitrator. It overall provides the investor with a product, a branded name and recognition, and a support system. A typical franchise agreement contains Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Disclosures required by state laws Parties defined in the agreement Recitals, such as Ownership of System, and Objectives of Parties Definitions, such asAgreement, Territory Area, Area Licensee, Authorized deductions, Gross Receipts, License Network, The System Manual, Trademarks, Start Date, Trade name, Termination, Transfer of license.Licensed Rights, such asTerritory, Rights Reserved, Term and Renewal, Minimum Performance StandardFranchisors Services, such asAdministration, Collections and Billing, Consultation, Marketing, Manual, TrainingFranchisee Payments, such asInitial Franchise Fee, Training Fees, Marketing Fund, Royalties, Renewal fee, and Transfer feeFranchisee Obligations, such asUse of Trademarks, Financial Information, Insurance, Financial and Legal responsibilityRelationship of Parties, such asConfidentiality, Indemnification, Non-Compete clausesTransfer of License, such asConsent of franchisor, Termination of license, Termination by licenseeOther provisions Governing law Amendments Waivers Arbitration Severability

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym for "tolerable"?
  • A. passable
  • B. fair to middling
  • C. constructive
  • D. adequate