Synonyms containing wear out ones welcome Page #7

We've found 23,678 synonyms:

Knoke

Knoke

Knoke is an unincorporated community in Calhoun County, Iowa, United States. Knoke is 4.5 miles west-southwest of Pomeroy. According to the community's welcome sign, it was founded in 1901, and its population was 21 as of 2001. The welcome sign advertises that Knoke is available via the next three exits which are the streets "Knoke Main", "Knoke Drive", and "Knoke Road".

— Freebase

Bathtub curve

Bathtub curve

The bathtub curve is widely used in reliability engineering. It describes a particular form of the hazard function which comprises three parts: ⁕The first part is a decreasing failure rate, known as early failures. ⁕The second part is a constant failure rate, known as random failures. ⁕The third part is an increasing failure rate, known as wear-out failures. The name is derived from the cross-sectional shape of a bathtub. The bathtub curve is generated by mapping the rate of early "infant mortality" failures when first introduced, the rate of random failures with constant failure rate during its "useful life", and finally the rate of "wear out" failures as the product exceeds its design lifetime. In less technical terms, in the early life of a product adhering to the bathtub curve, the failure rate is high but rapidly decreasing as defective products are identified and discarded, and early sources of potential failure such as handling and installation error are surmounted. In the mid-life of a product—generally, once it reaches consumers—the failure rate is low and constant. In the late life of the product, the failure rate increases, as age and wear take their toll on the product. Many consumer products strongly reflect the bathtub curve, such as computer processors.

— Freebase

Cycloalkane

Cycloalkane

Cycloalkanes are types of alkanes that have one or more rings of carbon atoms in the chemical structure of their molecules. Alkanes are types of organic hydrocarbon compounds that have only single chemical bonds in their chemical structure. Cycloalkanes consist of only carbon and hydrogen atoms and are saturated because there are no multiple C-C bonds to hydrogenate. A general chemical formula for cycloalkanes would be CnH2 where n = number of C atoms and g = number of rings in the molecule. Cycloalkanes with a single ring are named analogously to their normal alkane counterpart of the same carbon count: cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, cyclohexane, etc. The larger cycloalkanes, with greater than 20 carbon atoms are typically called cycloparaffins. Cycloalkanes are classified into small, common, medium, and large cycloalkanes, where cyclopropane and cyclobutane are the small ones, cyclopentane, cyclohexane, cycloheptane are the common ones, cyclooctane through cyclotridecane are the medium ones, and the rest are the larger ones.

— Freebase

Two's complement

Two's complement

Two's complement is a mathematical operation on binary numbers, as well as a binary signed number representation based on this operation. The two's complement of an N-bit number is defined as the complement with respect to 2, in other words the result of subtracting the number from 2. This is also equivalent to taking the ones' complement and then adding one, since the sum of a number and its ones' complement is all 1 bits. The two's complement of a number behaves like the negative of the original number in most arithmetic, and positive and negative numbers can coexist in a natural way. In two's-complement representation, negative numbers are represented by the two's complement of their absolute value; in general, negation is performed by taking the two's complement. This system is the most common method of representing signed integers on computers. An N-bit two's-complement numeral system can represent every integer in the range − to + while ones' complement can only represent integers in the range − to +. The two's-complement system has the advantage that the fundamental arithmetic operations of addition, subtraction, and multiplication are identical to those for unsigned binary numbers. This property makes the system both simpler to implement and capable of easily handling higher precision arithmetic. Also, zero has only a single representation, obviating the subtleties associated with negative zero, which exists in ones'-complement systems.

— Freebase

Monkwearmouth

Monkwearmouth

Monkwearmouth is an area of Sunderland located at the north side of the mouth of the River Wear. It was one of the three original settlements on the banks of the River Wear along with Bishopwearmouth and Sunderland, the area now known as the East End. It includes the area around St. Peter's Church, founded in 674 as part of Monkwearmouth-Jarrow Abbey, and was once the main centre of Wearside shipbuilding and coalmining in the town. It is now host to a campus of the University of Sunderland and the National Glass Centre. It is served by the three Church of England churches of the Parish of Monkwearmouth. The locals of the area were called "Barbary Coasters". The borough stretches from Wearmouth Bridge to the harbour mouth on the north side of the river and is one of the oldest parts of Sunderland. The former railway station, closed in 1968 by the Beeching Axe, is now the Monkwearmouth Station Museum and features a restored booking office dating from the Edwardian period. Since 2002 Monkwearmouth has once again been served by rail transport, this time via St Peter's Tyne and Wear Metro station a few hundred metres south of the old station. The area is also the home of the Stadium of Light, which was opened on the site of the abandoned Wearmouth Colliery in July 1997, and is the home of the football club Sunderland A.F.C., who had previously played at Roker Park.Wearmouth Colliery was closed in December 1993, and had been in operation for over 100 years.

— Wikipedia

Anodizing

Anodizing

Anodizing is an electrolytic passivation process used to increase the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of metal parts. The process is called anodizing because the part to be treated forms the anode electrode of an electrolytic cell. Anodizing increases resistance to corrosion and wear, and provides better adhesion for paint primers and glues than bare metal does. Anodic films can also be used for several cosmetic effects, either with thick porous coatings that can absorb dyes or with thin transparent coatings that add interference effects to reflected light. Anodizing is also used to prevent galling of threaded components and to make dielectric films for electrolytic capacitors. Anodic films are most commonly applied to protect aluminium alloys, although processes also exist for titanium, zinc, magnesium, niobium, zirconium, hafnium, and tantalum. Iron or carbon steel metal exfoliates when oxidized under neutral or alkaline micro-electrolytic conditions; i.e., the iron oxide (actually ferric hydroxide or hydrated iron oxide, also known as rust) forms by anoxic anodic pits and large cathodic surface, these pits concentrate anions such as sulfate and chloride accelerating the underlying metal to corrosion. Carbon flakes or nodules in iron or steel with high carbon content (high-carbon steel, cast iron) may cause an electrolytic potential and interfere with coating or plating. Ferrous metals are commonly anodized electrolytically in nitric acid or by treatment with red fuming nitric acid to form hard black Iron(II,III) oxide. This oxide remains conformal even when plated on wiring and the wiring is bent. Anodizing changes the microscopic texture of the surface and the crystal structure of the metal near the surface. Thick coatings are normally porous, so a sealing process is often needed to achieve corrosion resistance. Anodized aluminium surfaces, for example, are harder than aluminium but have low to moderate wear resistance that can be improved with increasing thickness or by applying suitable sealing substances. Anodic films are generally much stronger and more adherent than most types of paint and metal plating, but also more brittle. This makes them less likely to crack and peel from ageing and wear, but more susceptible to cracking from thermal stress.

— Wikipedia

Beizi

Beizi

A beizi (褙子) is an item of traditional Chinese attire common to both men and women, a large loose coat. It was most popular during the Song Dynasty and Ming Dynasty. The origin date of beizi is unknown, and someone believed that beizi and banbi had been adopted from Central Asia during the Song Dynasty through the Silk Road when cultural exchanges were frequent. However, it is also believed to have been derived from banbi during the Song Dynasty, where the sleeves and the garment lengthened.The gender difference is that while wide-sleeved beizi were considered formal wear for women (narrow-sleeved beizi were casual wear for women), both wide and narrow-sleeved beizi were only used as casual wear for men. It has a parallel/straight-collar (對襟) with side slits beginning at the armpit or at the waist. It can be secured at the front either with ties or a metal button.

— Wikipedia

Tonga

Tonga

An archipelago in Polynesia in the southwest Pacific Ocean, comprising about 150 islands. It is a kingdom whose capital is Nukualofa. It was discovered by the Dutch in 1616, visited by Tasman in 1643, and by Captain Cook in 1773 and 1777. The modern kingdom was established during the reign of King George Tupou I, 1845-93. It became a British protectorate in 1900 and gained independence in 1970. The name Tonga may be of local origin, meaning either island or holy. Its other name, Friendly Islands, was given by Captain Cook from the welcome given him by the natives. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1219 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p549)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Fáilte

Fáilte

Fáilte (Irish pronunciation: [ˈfˠaːlʲtʲə]), Fàilte (Scottish Gaelic: [ˈfaːltʲə]), and Failt (Manx: [ˈfaːlʲtʃ]) is a word meaning "welcome".This word appears in the Irish phrase céad míle fáilte (a hundred thousand welcomes) as well as the similar Scottish phrase ceud mìle fàilte and the Manx keead milley failt. It also occurs in the name of Fáilte Ireland and its predecessor organization, Bord Fáilte (Board of Welcome). Fáilte Towers, an RTÉ reality programme broadcast in Ireland in 2008, incorporates this word in its name as well.The accent above the a is a diacritic known in Irish as the síneadh fada (literally, long stretching, as it lengthens the vowel; often called just the fada in English), and as the stràc (pronounced [s̪t̪ɾaːxk]) in Scottish Gaelic.

— Wikipedia

John Henry Thomas

John Henry Thomas

John Henry Thomas (born 24 November 1854, in Truro, Cornwall, died February 22, 1928 in Moonta) was an Australian composer, editor, and conductor. He is known for composing several Cornish Christmas Carols and the 1897 publication of his book The Christmas Welcome, was released in Germany through C.G. Roder, Leipzig. Thomas learned to play music on a harmonium, which he kept into his adult life as one of his most treasured possessions.John Henry Thomas' father, John Thomas, was a miner in Cornwall and arrived in South Australia in 1885 with his wife, Catherine Jacka after the mining boom had occurred due to the discovery of copper in 1861 in Moonta. The mine became prosperous and many Cornish miners followed after an advertisement by the South Australian Government. In 1875 Moonta was the second largest town after the capital, Adelaide, with a population of 12,000 people. Thus the miners made an important contribution to the Australian economy and were crucial to the prospering of Moonta and the surrounding district. They brought their culture and traditions with them including their music which was pivotal in keeping their Cornish culture alive. This area became a virtual Cornish enclave and was named "Little Cornwall". John Henry Thomas helped to maintain the Cornish culture through his compositions and leadership in the musical community. Thomas moved to Australia with his parents as an infant and as an adult was active in Moonta, where he worked as a composer and conductor. In November 1878 J.H. Thomas married Elizabeth Ann Thomas, with whom he had four children. He was also active in the general community and served as a councilor from 1901 to 1903 and later as an auditor for many firms in the following years. Thomas also served as the leader of the Bible Christian Sunday School for 55 years and as the choirmaster and organist of the Bible Christian Choir, later renamed in 1923 to the Methodist Choir. He was also the resident conductor of the Moonta Fisks, conductor of the Moonta Military Band, and leader of the Moonta Male Voice Choir. Thomas would also conduct massed bands and combined choirs at the Moonta Recreational Grounds, during the "Back to Moonta" celebrations.In 1959 Thomas's carols in "The Christmas Welcome" were published in a collection of Cornish carols entitled A Collection of Cornish Carols, which was released via Allan & Co. They are sung every year in Cornish communities globally, especially at Christmas time.

— Wikipedia

Drunken Sailor

Drunken Sailor

"Drunken Sailor" is a sea shanty, also known as "What Shall We Do with a/the Drunken Sailor?" The shanty was sung to accompany certain work tasks aboard sailing ships, especially those that required a bright walking pace. It is believed to originate in the early 19th century or before, during a period when ships' crews, especially those of military vessels, were large enough to permit hauling a rope whilst simply marching along the deck. With the advent of merchant packet and clipper ships and their smaller crews, which required different working methods, use of the shanty appears to have declined or shifted to other, minor tasks. "Drunken Sailor" was revived as a popular song among non-sailors in the 20th century, and grew to become one of the best-known songs of the shanty repertoire among mainstream audiences. It has been performed and recorded by many musical artists and appeared in many popular media. Although the song's lyrics vary, they usually contain some variant of the question, "What shall we do with a drunken sailor, early in the morning?" In some styles of performance, each successive verse suggests a method of sobering or punishing the drunken sailor. In other styles, further questions are asked and answered about different people. The song shares its tune with the traditional Irish folk song "Óró sé do bheatha abhaile" (Irish pronunciation: [ˈoːɾˠoː ʃeː d̪ˠə ˈvʲahə walʲə], English: "Oh-ro welcome home"), possibly a Jacobite song, as the traditional version mentions Séarlas Óg ("Young Charles" in Irish), referring to Bonnie Prince Charlie and dating the song to the third Jacobite rising of 1745–6. The tune appears as number 1425 in George Petrie's The Complete Collection of Irish Music (1855) under the title Ó ro! ’sé do ḃeaṫa a ḃaile (modern script: Ó ro! ’sé do bheatha a bhaile) and is marked “Ancient clan march.” It can also be found at number 983 (also marked “Ancient Clan March”) and as a fragment at number 1056, titled Welcome home Prince Charley. "Óró sé do bheatha abhaile" was often sung by the Irish Volunteers during the Easter Rising, but with different, non-sectarian lyrics composed by Pádraig Pearse. The song is No. 322 in the Roud Folk Song Index.

— Wikipedia

Durable good

Durable good

In economics, a durable good or a hard good is a good that does not quickly wear out, or more specifically, one that yields utility over time rather than being completely consumed in one use. Items like bricks could be considered perfectly durable goods, because they should theoretically never wear out. Highly durable goods such as refrigerators, cars, or mobile phones usually continue to be useful for three or more years of use, so durable goods are typically characterized by long periods between successive purchases. Examples of consumer durable goods include cars, household goods, sports equipment, firearms, and toys. Nondurable goods or soft goods are the opposite of durable goods. They may be defined either as goods that are immediately consumed in one use or ones that have a lifespan of less than 3 years. Examples of nondurable goods include fast moving consumer goods such as cosmetics and cleaning products, food, fuel, beer, cigarettes, medication, office supplies, packaging and containers, paper and paper products, personal products, rubber, plastics, textiles, clothing and footwear. While durable goods can usually be rented as well as bought, nondurable goods generally are not rented. While buying durable goods comes under the category of Investment demand of Goods, buying Non-Durables comes under the category of Consumption demand of Goods.

— Freebase

swoll

swoll

Fat or muscular. Bulky. pockets fulla ones them ones and we came to have some fun do you wanna dance ones got my pockets swoll easy access to these hoes -- Slim Nadir (Pocket Fulla Ones - Remix)

— Rap Dictionary

Exhaust

Exhaust

to drain, metaphorically; to use or expend wholly, or till the supply comes to an end; to deprive wholly of strength; to use up; to weary or tire out; to wear out; as, to exhaust one's strength, patience, or resources

— Webster Dictionary

Draw

Draw

draw, v.t. to pull along: to bring forcibly towards one: to entice, attract: to coax into giving information: to make one express himself (also to Draw out a man): to inhale: to take out: to evoke or bring out by some artifice: to extract by pulling: to cast lots: to extract the essence of: to eviscerate (hang, draw, and quarter): to manufacture (wire) by drawing through a small hole: to deduce: to lengthen: to extend to the full length (as in drawing a bow): to force to appear (as a badger from its hole): to receive (as revenues): to demand money by a draft: to make a picture of, by lines drawn: to describe: to require a depth of water for floating.—v.i. to pull: to practise drawing: to move: to approach: to have a free current (of a chimney):—pa.t. drew (drōō); pa.p. drawn.—n. the act of drawing: anything drawn: a drawn or undecided game.—adj. Draw′able.—ns. Draw′back, a disadvantage: a receiving back some part of the duty on goods on their exportation; Draw′-bar (same as Drag-bar); Draw′-boy, the boy who pulls the cords of the harness in figure-weaving, a mechanical device for this purpose; Draw′bridge, a bridge that can be drawn up or let down at pleasure; Drawēē′, the person on whom a bill of exchange is drawn; Draw′prime;er, he or that which draws: one who draws beer or fetches liquor in a tavern: a thing drawn out, like the sliding box in a case: (pl.) a close under-garment for the lower limbs; Draw′-gear, the apparatus by which railway-cars are coupled; Draw′ing, the art of representing objects by lines drawn, shading, &c.: a picture: the distribution of prizes, as at a lottery; Draw′ing-board; Draw′ing-frame, a machine in which carded wool, cotton, or the like is drawn out fine; Draw′ing-knife, a knife with a handle at each end, used by coopers for shaving hoops by drawing it towards one; Draw′ing-mas′ter; Draw′ing-pā′per; Draw′ing-pen; Draw′ing-pen′cil; Draw′ing-room, in engineering, a room where plans and patterns are drawn; Draw′ing-tā′ble, a table which can be extended in length by drawing out sliding leaves; Draw′-net (same as Drag-net); Draw′-plate, a plate of steel or ruby with a hole drilled in it through which wire, tubing, or the like is drawn to make it more slender; Draw′-well, a well from which water is drawn up by a bucket and apparatus.—Draw a bead on (see Bead); Draw a blank (see Blank); Draw a cover, to send the hounds into a cover to frighten out a fox; Draw blank, to do so, but find no fox; Draw back, to retire: to withdraw from an engagement; Draw cuts, to cast lots; Draw in, to reduce, contract: to become shorter; Draw it fine, to be too precise; Draw it mild, to state a thing without exaggeration; Draw near, to approach; Draw off, to take wine, ale, &c. out of a barrel: to retire; Draw on, to approach (of a fixed date); Draw on one's imagination, to make imaginative or lying statements; Draw on one's memory, to try to remember; Draw out<

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
An antonym for "prosperous"
  • A. palmy
  • B. achromatic
  • C. comfortable
  • D. flourishing