Synonyms containing wear out ones welcome Page #8

We've found 23,676 synonyms:

Exhaust

Exhaust

egz-awst′, v.t. to draw out the whole of: to use the whole strength of: to wear or tire out: to treat of or develop completely.—n. the exit of steam from the cylinder when it has done its work in propelling the piston—escaping by the exhaust-pipe and regulated by the exhaust-valve.—p.adj. Exhaust′ed, drawn out: emptied: consumed: tired out.—n. Exhaust′er, he who or that which exhausts.—adj. Exhaust′ible, that may be exhausted.—n. Exhaust′ion, act of exhausting or consuming: state of being exhausted: extreme fatigue.—adjs. Exhaust′ive, tending to exhaust; Exhaust′less, that cannot be exhausted. [L. exhaurīre, exhaustumex, out, haurīre, to draw.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases

Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases

Enzymes that catalyze the dehydrogenation of GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE. Several types of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase exist including phosphorylating and non-phosphorylating varieties and ones that transfer hydrogen to NADP and ones that transfer hydrogen to NAD.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Mating Preference, Animal

Mating Preference, Animal

The selection or choice of sexual partner in animals. Often this reproductive preference is based on traits in the potential mate, such as coloration, size, or behavioral boldness. If the chosen ones are genetically different from the rejected ones, then NATURAL SELECTION is occurring.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Incaviglia

Incaviglia

inward outward, in is out. 2.european cur type,2.unbeknownst inward self outward. 3.to out ones self inward,4.introverting to you, to not know ones inward self. 5. self skill

— Editors Contribution

Dress code

Dress code

A dress code is a set of rules governing what garments may be worn together and in what setting. Examples of dress codes are combinations such as "smart casual", or "morning dress". A classification of these codes is normally made for varying levels of formality and times of day. In traditional Western dressing, for men the more formal dress codes, such as "black tie", are highly codified with essentially fixed definitions, mostly unchanged for more than fifty years, while the more casual classifications change very quickly, and a worldwide or widely relevant discussion is impossible. For women, changes in fashion are more rapid. In practical use, dress codes are either followed intuitively, enforced by peer pressure, so that people wear similar clothing in the same situations. Alternatively, at more formal events where a dress code is specified, invitees wear clothes at the specified level; if some variation is permitted, the host will wear the most formal option to save guests the embarrassment of out-dressing him. Appropriate national dress is generally permitted, and national variations are also widely worn as an exception to the trend of uniformity with peers, often in the form of headgear.

— Freebase

Tea gown

Tea gown

A tea gown or tea-gown is a woman's at-home dress for informal entertaining of the late 19th to mid-20th centuries characterized by unstructured lines and light fabrics. Early tea gowns were a European development influenced by Asian clothing, part of the japonism of Aesthetic dress. Later tea gowns featured frothy or feminine detail: Every one knows that a tea-gown is a hybrid between a wrapper and a ball dress. It has always a train and usually long flowing sleeves; is made of rather gorgeous materials and goes on easily, and its chief use is not for wear at the tea-table so much as for dinner alone with one's family. It can, however, very properly be put on for tea, and if one is dining at home, kept on for dinner. Otherwise a lady is apt to take tea in whatever dress she had on for luncheon, and dress after tea for dinner. One does not go out to dine in a tea-gown except in the house of a member of one's family or a most intimate friend. One would wear a tea-gown in one's own house in receiving a guest to whose house one would wear a dinner dress. – Emily Post, Etiquette, 1922. In contemporary usage, any flowing dress of sheer or translucent fabric, in pastel colors, mid-calf to ankle-length, may be called a tea gown.

— Freebase

Mando

Mando

Mando or Manddo is a musical form that evolved during the 19th and 20th century among Goan Catholics of Goa, India. It represents the meeting point of Indian and western musical traditions. The music has elements of both Indian and western culture. The males wear formal coats, showing Portuguese influence, while females wear a unique Indian costume. The ceremonial torhop-baz worn during the mando dance was of velvet or silk, red, blue or green in colour, embroidered with gold threads. A white or blue shawl was worn. The socks had to be white and the slippers ornamented. This was all graced with a fan, which enhanced the lady's mood with a secret charm during the dance. Nowadays mandos are highlighted with their dance respective of their song. The plural of manddo in Konkani is mande.The major theme of mandos is love, the minor ones being historical narratives, grievance against exploitation and social injustice, and political resistance during the Portuguese presence in Goa.With grace in voice charm in costumes the performances are enhanced. The accent in Konkani is almost always on the last syllable. The dialect used in the classical mandos is the Bambonn Saxtti of Salcete, particularly as spoken in the villages of Benaulim, Curtorim, Loutolim, Chinchinim, Assolna, Betul, Velim, Cuncolim, Navelim and Raia, where most of them originated. It is the most musical of the Konkani dialects with its consistent use of elisions. One of the characteristics of this dialect is that words are stretched out in pronunciation with the addition of an extra vowel sound either in the middle of the words or at the end epenthesis. Thus the word dista is lengthened to disota and sanddlear into sanddilear. The suffixes –i and –o are commonly used to add an extra syllable to a line. Thus larar becomes larari and neketr becomes neketro. The full sound -o- is softened in this dialect. Thus roddonk becomes roddunk, mozo becomes muzo. The possessive pronouns in the mando have the Salcete form, as tugel´lem for tujem, mugel´lem for mujem or mojem. Shorter forms are derived when the music needs to cut off a syllable, e.g. tuj´ kodden instead of tuje koddem and mak´ naka instead of maka naka. Not only the phonetics correspond to the Salcete dialect but also words like masoli for “fish” instead of nishtem, e.g. “Dongrari fulo nam, doriant masli pun nam”. The Brahmins address a girl or a woman with “rê” instead of “gô” and use the pronoun “ti” instead of “tem”.

— Freebase

brace aback

brace aback

To brace the yards in, so as to lay the sails aback.--To brace about, to turn the yards round for the contrary tack, or in consequence of a change of wind.--To brace abox, a manœuvre to insure casting the right way, by bracing the head-yards flat aback (not square).--To brace by, to brace the yards in contrary directions to each other on the different masts, to effect the stopping of the vessel. (See COUNTER-BRACE.)--To brace in, to lay the yard less oblique, as for a free wind, or nearly square.--To brace round, synonymous with brace about.--To brace sharp, to cause the yards to have the smallest possible angle with the keel, for the ship to have head-way: deemed generally to form an angle of 20° with the keel.--To brace to, is to check or ease off the lee braces, and round in the weather ones, to assist in the manœuvre of tacking or wearing.--To brace up, or brace sharp up, to lay the yards more obliquely fore and aft, by easing off the weather-braces and hauling in the lee ones, which enables a ship to lie as close to the wind as possible.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Line-out

Line-out

A line-out is the means by which, in rugby union, the ball is put back into play after it has gone into touch. It is the equivalent of the throw-in in association football. Rugby league abolished line-outs in 1897. Instead, a scrum takes place 20 metres infield from the spot where the ball went out and where a line-out would take place in rugby union. When a player puts the ball into touch, the opposing team is awarded a line-out. An exception is that if the ball is kicked into touch from a penalty kick, the team that was awarded the penalty throws into the resulting line-out. Where the line-out is taken depends on the manner in which the ball was played into touch. If it is kicked directly into touch, without first landing in the field-of-play or touching the referee or an opponent who is not in touch, the line-out is formed in line with the spot from where it was kicked, with two exceptions: if the kick was a penalty kick or if the kicker had at least one foot on or behind his own 22-metre line, the line-out is formed at the spot where the ball crossed the touch-line. In all other cases, the line-out is formed at the spot where the ball crossed the touch-line, except that if this spot is within 5 metres of the goal-line, the line-out is formed on the 5-metre line. A line-out is also awarded if a player in possession of the ball crosses or touches the touchline whilst still in possession of the ball.

— Freebase

breath of fresh air

breath of fresh air

a welcome relief

— Princeton's WordNet

glad hand

glad hand

a warm welcome; may be insincere

— Princeton's WordNet

inhospitality

inhospitality

unkind and inconsiderate welcome

— Princeton's WordNet

intrusion

intrusion

entrance by force or without permission or welcome

— Princeton's WordNet

persona non grata

unwelcome person, persona non grata

a person who for some reason is not wanted or welcome

— Princeton's WordNet

receive

welcome, receive

bid welcome to; greet upon arrival

— Princeton's WordNet

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. iffy
  • B. certain
  • C. dicey
  • D. chancy